Posts Tagged empathy

It’s Time to Recognize! ST Teams 2019

It’s Time to Recognize! ST Teams 2019

Every year this is always the most difficult blog to write because I don’t know where to begin to describe the talent and passion of the youth that I am so blessed to work with. I usually only try to speak for myself, but I can say with 100% certainty that Montaja, Mike, all our TAs, and I are so incredibly proud of each and every one of you. This week’s Recognition Event was an absolutely magical experience and if you missed it, we can’t wait to share it with you!

 

featureA little bit about Stand Together/this year: ST has been in schools for the past six years, expanding each year to reach more and more middle and high school youth through student-driven anti-stigma projects that are increasing education and awareness, promoting social inclusion, and encouraging help-seeking behaviors. This year, ST trained 18 schools, 16 of which completed projects, and 14 were able to participate in this year’s event. The Heinz History Center was packed with youth and adult advocates that are enthusiastic about ending the stigma associated with mental and substance use disorders. This was our biggest year yet, with around 300 in attendance!

 

Our schools designed and implemented so many uniqueOC table-r and innovative projects for their peers. The tried & true food and beverage stands are always a hit. Mental health fairs and presentations are making a come-back. Several schools decorated 1 in 4 stairs and their stairwells, while others created murals and plastered pledges on the walls. Some of our most creative projects for this year included Propel BHHS’s ‘Shine a Light on Mental Health’ paper lantern activity, WMHS’s ‘Toilet Talk’ booth, Shaler HS’s ‘Truth Tree,’ and SVMS’s ‘March Madness’ basketball tournament. Each year the students’ projects amaze us more and more, but the most important piece is the impact the students share about the changes that are taking place in their school culture. Take a look:

 

WMHS presenters

WMHS presenters

Student presenters shared that students are more comfortable talking about mental health and are more apt to reach out to ask questions and seek help. Students are using less stigmatizing language and aware and respectful of the invisible challenges they may be facing. The school culture is more accepting, encouraging, and supportive. Teachers and staff are forming relationships with students and challenging their own assumptions and stigmas. Lives are being changed daily thanks to the work of these students and advisors and we couldn’t be more proud.

 

Stigma is not gone, but little by little, our teams

N. Allegheny students at the photo booth

N. Allegheny students at the photo booth

are ‘chipping’ (cookie joke) away to break stigma and create better mental health environments in schools and even their communities. Events like these help the students see that they are part of something bigger than the projects in their individual schools-they can and are making a difference. As our keynote speaker remarked, ‘You may never know the ripple effects of your work,’ but we can already see the changes that are taking place-and we look forward to an even ‘brighter’ (lantern pun) future for mental and substance use disorders.

 

We can’t thank you enough for all the time, talent, and commitment you’ve contributed to this cause. We’re lucky enough to be able to lay the foundation-and then you run with your ideas and plans and turn this into something marvelous and meaningful. To our all teams, congratulations on another amazing year stopping stigma, one project at a time.

 

 

Special thanks to our school teams:

 

ST TY poster-r

 

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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W. Allegheny Connects with Staff with Snacks & Conversation

W. Allegheny Connects with Staff with Snacks & Conversation

Students at West Allegheny High School held a staff-student activity last week to form relationships with the teachers, faculty, and administration at their school. One of Stand Together’s goals is to encourage youth to reach out to an adult they trust when they’re worried about themselves or someone else. In order to feel comfortable reaching out to adults, youth need to have a relationship and rapport to do so. The WA team felt like this is something they really wanted to focus on this year. Last year, they really focused on increasing education and promoting inclusion and they felt like this was a logical step to promote help-seeking behaviors.

 

IMG_20190207_143335Staff were welcomed with snacks and water. Who doesn’t love food? It works for student projects and adults alike! The plates also had facts about mental and substance use disorders on them to set the tone. Then the students began the event by explaining what Stand Together is and what their goals were as a team and for the specific activity. To introduce the impact of mental and substance use disorders, the students had one in four staff around the room stand up to represent the one in four youth that are affected by a mental and/or substance use disorders in a given year. This visual representation served as a bridge to spreading awareness of the prevalence of these disorders in their students and how much an individual’s lives can be affected, even outside the signs/symptoms that they are experiencing.

 

 

Students got administrative approval to use a staff inservice, which is required for all faculty. Even though they were required to attend, most of them were actively involved in the discussions and were exciting to engage with the students. The staff were randomly assigned to a group and the students rotating around the room in pairs presenting questions about mental health and their role with youth. Some of theseIMG_20190207_145408 questions included:

  • What signs do you look for/see when a student is struggling?

  • What are the challenges you have when forming relationships with students?

  • How can relationships with students be both personal and professional?

  • What would help you be able to better help students?

 

Both the students and staff also shared some of their own personal experiences with each other. One student self-disclosed his own mental health conditions, which promoted the idea of both youth and adults regarding each other as people-first, regardless of their other roles or diagnoses. A staff member shared, ‘we don’t have perfect lives either and that helps me relate to some of my students.’ Other faculty described how they connect with students by utilizing humor and their own life-experiences. Mental and substance use disorders affect the individual outside of the disorder, and when they are getting help and have trust in the adults that are in their environment, students are more willing to learn and these connections make a positive impact. Students and staff alike shared discussions about the importance of balance in life, both inside and outside school and in professional and personal lives.

 

 

I was pleasantly surprised by the vulnerability and willingness of both the students and staff during this event. It was evident that the activity had created a sense of understanding and feelings of connection between the youth and adults. I was so proud to be able to observe and witness this meaningful occasion. I know without a doubt this activity was a great success. Thank you for decreasing stigma so that more youth feel comfortable reaching out to adults for help!

 

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Written by Danyelle, coordinator

 

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North Allegheny Tigers Talk Truth-Awareness & Inclusion

North Allegheny Tigers Talk Truth-Awareness & Inclusion

Another first year school, North Allegheny High School was incredibly impressive. Right off the bat, the students were already aware of many of the myths and were prepared to counter them with facts as early as the first activity. It was such a privilege working with such a passionate and aware group. Most of the team is also members of the school’s S.A.D.D. group. Even though they had some bonds and connections (and a decent knowledge of mental health), there were still plenty of new people to meet and new information to learn and share.

 

IMG_20181101_135505Although the students were very quiet at first, with some encouragement they quickly opened up. Everyone was willing and excited to participate in the trainings. One of our larger groups (30 members), it can be intimidating, especially for more reserved students. The most memorable moment for me was the discussion after Cross the Line. IMG_20181101_133950There were so many different perspectives and each student had a unique story to share. The group was vulnerable with each other and left the day feeling empowered to challenge others’ thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors to decrease stigma in their school.

 

IMG_20181113_102404The team couldn’t wait to start planning their projects. As a large school with many staircases, the students decided to use them to their advantage to kick-off the year by grabbing the students’ attention. Stand Together will be decorating each fourth step with green tape to provide a visual representation of the ratio of individuals that are affected by a mental and/or substance use disorder (1:4). The students plan to follow this activity with a video of both students and faculty sharing their own personal experiences with mental health, whether their own or someone they know. This will also serve as a transition to a form of Truth Booth the students will facilitate later in the year. The team also has a few other small activities throughout the year, so they’re definitely going to be busy!

 

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A special shout-out goes to Mr. Longo, one of their advisors. He spent almost a year trying to get Stand Together into N.A. and it’s definitely paid off. The group is great, the advisors are invested, and leadership is abound. We can’t wait to see their projects in action this Spring!

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Flashback Friday: Avonworth Antelopes Leap Into Stand Together

Flashback Friday: Avonworth Antelopes Leap Into Stand Together

Avonworth High Schools’ interest in Stand Together was many months in the making. After meeting with their SAP team for the first time last February, Lacey and I facilitated mini-sessions at their Teen Summit to introduce the students to mental health, stigma, and Stand Together. We were incredibly impressed by their emotional intelligence and almost every group had a student share their experiences. It was moving for both the students and our staff. I couldn’t wait to work with this group!

 

IMG_20181105_082119Another diverse group, the students really enjoyed getting to know each other outside of the classroom. Activities such as ‘Candy Gram’ encourage students to learn more about another participant and find qualities, interests, and views they share. Candy is randomly distributed and students have to find their ‘match.’ Then, they have three minutes to find three things they have in common. The catch: they can’t be obvious! (i.e. same school/grade, visible traits, etc.) More often than not, students can find more than three items to share with the rest of the group in just that short amount of time. Although a simple exercise, this activity really increases the students’ ability and experience of social inclusion.

 

In addition, this was the first time our new assistant Ami shared her recovery story with the group. Many students could relate to her experiences and life choices and it greatly made an impact. We’ve found that exposure to a first-person narrative of someone with lived experience with a mental and/or substance use disorder is the most effective way to challenge stigma. This part of the day also lends itself to the afternoon’s activities, in which students participate in activities where they are asked to be vulnerable with each other. The workshop experience is incredibly important to the cohesiveness of the group and the success of Stand Together; students not only learn the information and concepts they need to facilitate activities with their peers, but they also experience the ideals of social inclusion and a warm, compassionate school culture, where students feel free to be who they are and to get the help they need when they’re struggling.

 

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IMG_20181105_082212Although their first year, the students and advisors challenged themselves to facilitate three informative activities to increase education and awareness in their student body as well as with staff. Members will kick-off their year by meeting with classes to introduce the students to Stand Together and expose them to some of the myths and facts surrounding mental and substance use disorders. Their next activity focuses on S.H.E. (support, hope, and encouragement) and encouragesIMG_20181105_104116 and educates their peers on how to provide S.H.E. to their fellow classmates when they are experiencing mental health challenges-and of course, the team will use food to draw them in! (It works!) The team will also engage others in a make-shift photo booth with decorations and facts about mental health and substance use disorders to review what the students have learned in the other activities. Then the students will create a collage with the photos to display when the event is complete. We’re sure they’re really going to make a dent in stigma!

 

 

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Congrats, Avonworth, on a great training and we look forward to an amazing year!

 

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Throwback Thursday: W. Allegheny Indians Return with Intention & Innovation

Throwback Thursday: W. Allegheny Indians Return with Intention & Innovation

This is West Allegheny’s second year in Stand Together and they return with even more excitement and creativity. Although last year was their first year in the program, they went above and beyond with three unique food give-aways and two assemblies that really made an impact in their school. This year, we expect nothing less-and even more!

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IMG_20181030_121443The students at West Allegheny are not only very knowledgeable about mental health and have an incredible passion for their work, but they are also very open about their own challenges. Although this is not something that is entirely unique in Stand Together teams, WA students are incredibly vocal and vulnerable both inside and outside of the group and this has a tremendous impact on their peers, as well as the students themselves.IMG_20181023_101711_1

 

This year we added some additional information about substance use. The students had many questions and I even had to get back to some of them! The students were very thoughtful and empathetic when considering their responses and reactions to the role-play scenarios and loved the WHAPP game. It got pretty heated throughout several of the activities, including the fan-favorite, Ships & Sailors, and there was even a friendly spat between brothers!

 

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The students returned this year with a stronger sense of the school needs and how they wanted to change the schoolIMG_20181030_101408 culture. Although the value of education is still there, this year students really wanted to increase the awareness of the staff and challenge them in their relationships with students. One of the goals of Stand Together is to encourage students to reach out to an adult they trust when they are worried about themselves or others and relationships with staff and teachers are critical to facilitating this process. Students plan to use professional development time to provide some education and awareness to staff, but also promote social inclusion and help-seeking behaviors by connecting with the members of the group. In addition, the group is planning a Color Run in the spring to engage their entire school as well as the community in their efforts to end stigma.

 

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It’s going to be another big year for West Allegheny. Although the idea of completing projects of this caliber can be daunting, we have no doubts the students will rise to the challenge and defy all expectations. This group is full of strong leaders, passionate voices, and big hearts. We can’t wait to see your projects in action!

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Flashback Friday: Allderdice HS is BACK-with a Vengeance to FINISH THAT DRAGON!

Flashback Friday: Allderdice HS is BACK-with a Vengeance to FINISH THAT DRAGON!

Allderdice High School (PPS) has returned for their second year to Stand Together-and a devotion to finish one of their projects from last year, a dragon mural to ‘burn stigma.’ In addition, they’re hoping to do a couple other projects to reach their peers in a variety of ways.

 

IMG_20181015_110544The students at Allderdice tend to be one of our most diverse groups and it definitely brings a lot of different experiences to the table. There were also two teachers that teamed up with the group this year and are excited to join the group. They also had many returning members and they came back with the same passion and IMG_20181025_100207tenacity they finished the year with in 2018. Both the students and advisors were very moved by Cross the Line, breaking down the barriers and stereotypes they had for each other. Several students shared their own struggles with mental illness.

 

The best part of the day for me was when the students responded to the What Would You Do? scenarios. They had very thoughtful answers and had the skills to assess situations for WHAPP (withdrawal, hopelessness, agitation, poor self care, and personality change) and implement SHE (support, hope, encouragement) in their responses. Student relationships and the youth voice are crucial to the success of Stand Together and over the years, groups refine their skills to provide empathy, information, and resources to their peers.

 

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The group definitely bonded over the two days of training and are looking forward to finishing planning their projects and implementing them in the spring. Keep an eye out for that dragon!

 

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Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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South Park HS Doesn’t ‘Sleep’ on their Mental Health! #staywoke

South Park HS Doesn’t ‘Sleep’ on their Mental Health! #staywoke

IMG_3404South Park High School just completed their first year of Stand Together training! Day 1 consisted of a lot of educational pieces, but the students breezed through the material because they were already so knowledgeable about mental illness, substance abuse, and stigma! They had great responses and conversations throughout day 1 about how mental illness and substance abuse affects everyone in different ways.IMG_3418

 

Day 2 consisted of project planning! Before planning, the students reviewed the material from day 1 of training through a game of Jeopardy. I was so impressed with how much information the students had retained from the following week. Later in the day the students did an activity called Common Ground. It was hilarious to see the students rushing around to try and find an empty seat and bonus – no one broke an arm! Yay!

 

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IMG_3428Once we began project planning, the students got so hyped up! They started spit balling ideas that usually a first-year school wouldn’t come up with! My team and I were extremely impressed. The students decided on introducing themselves to their student body through a donut stand during study hall periods. The slogans that the students came up with were hysterical and so clever! I cannot wait to see their projects throughout the year. South Park High School blew me away!

 

Good luck this year students. Your passion and creativity will make an enormous impact on your student body. Thank you for supporting the fight against stigma towards mental illness and substance abuse!!!

 

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Written by Lacey, trainer

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WMHS: Breaking the Silence-for the Sixth Year!

WMHS: Breaking the Silence-for the Sixth Year!

West Mifflin High School has been with Stand Together from the start and each year they continue to amaze us with their student’s passion and drive for ending stigma in their schools. Each year, they’ve created a sort of Breaking the Silence week or day in which they spend discussing mental health in a positive way and spreading awareness of stigma-and how to stop it. One of Stand Together’s mottos is: ‘Stigma causes shame. Shame causes silence. Silence hurts us all.’ West Mifflin is yet again breaking down barriers to decrease stigma and increase education/awareness, social inclusion, and help-seeking behaviors.

 

IMG_20180928_132621WMHS is usually our largest group and this year they had 41 students participate in the two-day workshops. Many of the students had been in the program before, but there were also a large portion that this was their first year in the program-even some seniors! Students were selected by the program by an application process that hones in on the goals of Stand Together and how participants can be effective ‘change-makers’ in their school. This group was excited, prepared, and vocal for both days of the training.

 

Although the school has been in the program for a long time, it was empowering to hear that some of the students felt that this was the tightest group so far. Although they were quiet at first (I had to pass around a happy sparkle stick so they’d all participate!), they bonded a great deal throughout the day and some students remarked that they had learned more than they ever had. This year, we added additional information about specific diagnoses and substances to the training, as well as scenarios that encouraged the students to assess the signs of emotional concern and determine how they would approach that individual, what they would say, and how they would use S.H.E. (support, hope, and encouragement) to reach out to that person. The students came up with very compassionate, empathetic, and supportive responses and I’m sure they would be ready if they were in a situation in which they were concerned about themselves or someone else.


The second workshop, as always, is the ‘fan favorite.’ We didn’t even get through the rest of the training, as the students were so excited and into project ideas and planning! Typically the group does a few large events and several small events each year. By the end of the day, the IMG_20181011_103049students had come up with concrete plans for five projects and had planned on working on a couple more throughout the year. This year, they will be bringing back the balloon release, truth booth, and an assembly. In a twist to their traditional ‘Break the Silence’ event, they will be engaging students in an activity to get to know other students that they did not know and find things they have in common. The team also want to have a concert-style event with participants from the school band, chorus, and drama departments, as well as recovery speakers and activities. It’s going to be a HUGE endeavor, but the students are incredibly dedicated to make this happen.

 

It was definitely emotional, exciting, and inspiring two days of training and WMHS is well on there way to having another great year-it could be their best yet!

 

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Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Speak to Me: Montour HS Talks about Stigma

Speak to Me: Montour HS Talks about Stigma

3The first school we had this year for training was Montour High School. Before we even began the training, I was so impressed with this school. They have an awesome room where students can go talk with another student peer. I could tell this school was going to have a great couple of training days.

 

By the end of day 1, I was so impressed with this group and how2 emotionally mature they are! All of the students were participating during our education section which made for some intriguing conversations. At the end of day 1, you could feel the excitement that the students had for this program.

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On Day 2 we did some project planning and almost completed the “Food-4-Though” toolkit! The students worked in groups to discuss separate ideas for how they could do the project. We all came together at the end and collaborated. The students showed each other respect and listened to one another’s ideas, giving their opinions and suggestions in a kind manner. Before we knew it, the day was over!

 

I am so excited to see what these students will create. I really feel like they have a passion for ending the stigma within their school. Excellent job, Montour!!!

 

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Written by Lacey, trainer

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Time 2 Talk Day 2018: TALK ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH!!!

Time 2 Talk Day 2018: TALK ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH!!!

Stand Together students are having conversations about mental health, substance use disorders, and stigma all the time, but we want to take the time today to emphasize how important talking about mental health is and how much of an impact it can have on  an individual’s life.

 

1 in 41 in 4 students are affected by a mental health condition in a given year. That means out of a group of four friends, one of them will experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, or trauma that year. That’s a lot! And the data shows that this is clearly a problem:
-suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death in 12-18 year olds
-90% of individuals that complete suicide have a diagnosable mental health or substance use disorder
-6 out of 10 adolescents that are experiencing mental health concerns don’t receive treatment

 

And these conditions not only affect an individuals mental health, but other areas as well:
-poor academic performance (aka not doing well in school)
-absenteeism (aka not going to school)
-behavior problems (fighting, outbursts, etc.)
-24-44% don’t graduate from high school
-those that don’t graduate are 12x more likely to be arrested

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So after all of those sad statistics, what can we do? TALK ABOUT IT! Now is that time! Today is a great day to have a conversation about mental health.

-Ask someone how they are feeling and truly listen

SHE_image-Reach out to a friend that you haven’t seen in a while and see if they want to do something.

-Don’t use stigmatizing language, such as ‘crazy,’ ‘bipolar,’ ‘freak,’ etc. and when others say those words, use it as an opportunity to educate them about mental health conditions.

-Be open, honest, and genuine; share your own experiences and respond with empathy.

-If you know someone is struggling or has a mental health condition, treat them the same; they are the same person-they are just like everyone one else, but they just happen to have a MHC. *person-first*

-Most important, just be there and remember SHE: support, hope, and encouragement.

 

Check out the Time 2 Talk website for more information.

 

 

Take the time to talk about mental health today. You could be the difference in someone’s life. Don’t waste that opportunity!

 

-Written by Danyelle, Project Coordinator

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