Posts Tagged resiliency

The Academy Spreads Cheer & Creates Calm!

The Academy Spreads Cheer & Creates Calm!

Stand Together went in to the Academy last fall to begin training on stigma, mental illness, and substance abuse. This was my first time facilitating a training so I was a bit nervous! As we began the day, I began to see how emotionally mature these students were and how much they truly know already about stigma. We discussed many relevant stereotypes seen in society, and I enjoyed every single student’s input. I could tell that this subject was something they were passionate about, and I knew they would have an awesome year!

 

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One activity we did that they seemed to really enjoy was the “Common Ground” activity where someone stands in the middle and says, “I see common ground with…,” then everyone who the statement applies to must get up 1and move to a different chair. Even though at times it got competitive, the students really saw how much more they have in common with others than different.

 

I returned to the Academy this spring to check out the student’s projects. I came on the day they were implementing their “Cup of Cheer” project. This entailed putting inspirational quotes onto cups and stuffing the cups with coffee, tea, a Stand Together bookmark, and a jelly bracelet that said Stand Together. The students also created a “calm down” room at their school. Inside the room was a mural that the students painted, giving hope and positivity to the students who come into the room needing a break.

 

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I am extremely proud of all the hard work these students did this past year. It was amazing to see them work together on accomplishing such an important goal, ending stigma! Thank you, the Academy! 😊

 

 

Written by Lacey, Project Trainer

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Holiday PSA: Stress, Self-Care, and Mental Health

Holiday PSA: Stress, Self-Care, and Mental Health
Maker:L,Date:2017-9-23,Ver:5,Lens:Kan03,Act:Kan02,E-ve

Danyelle sharing a part of her recovery story at When the Holidays Hurt…

For most, the holidays are a time of great joy, excitement, and family fun, but for many of us, the holidays hurt. They’re hard. They’re not ‘pretty presents wrapped up in a bow’ or feel-good festivities, but sources of pain, struggle, and/or sadness. Memories of a lost loved one, negative feelings/experiences, and expectations can make it difficult to enjoy this time of the year. I shared my experiences last night at a Human Library presentation; we’re not alone in our struggle. Some of us, myself included, also experience Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), which means that when the sun is in low supply and it’s cold and dreary, our mental health takes a nose dive. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to consume us. Whether you have a mental health condition or not, there are things you can do to de-stress and engage in acts of self-care to promote positive mental health over this season.

1.  It’s OKAY to take a break from family, especially if they challenge your mental health. You can do this respectfully by setting boundaries and limits. It’s okay to politely excuse yourself for a few moments (or longer) to collect yourself, reconnect, and reboot.

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2. Back to Basics: self-care also includes eating healthy foods, exercising, and making sure you get enough sleep. Putting yourself first is not selfish; it’s necessary. It’s okay to indulge in some holiday treats-Hello! Christmas Cookies!-but we like to stick to an 80-20 rule (80% clean/healthy, 20% not so much).

REI-_OptOutside_Anthem_Film_153. Get Outside! Remember REI’s catch-phrase #optoutside? Even though sunshine is hard to come by this time of the year, getting some fresh air is good for the body, mind, and spirit. Be mindful of your surroundings: What do you smell? Hear? See? Feel? Embrace the now! Pet that dog (probably ask first). Catch a snowflake on your tongue. Take a good wiff of that bakery-it’s okay to stop in for a treat too :)

4. Do what YOU do! Make sure to engage in activities you enjoy. Read a book, watch a movie, knit, bake…whatever you like to do, make time for you! Little moments of stability can do wonders for your mood.

5. Be mindful. Savor the good times. Stay positive; surround yourself with positive people, if you can. Make time for those friends you haven’t seen in a while or spend some time with that favorite relative. Our perspective determines our reality; if we’re looking for good things, we’ll be able to find them. Practice gratitude and celebrate the small things. Imperfections are a part of the ride and they don’t define the event/who you are.

expecations6. Set realistic expectations. Society bombards us of the idea of this ‘perfect family holiday’ where everyone holds hands and sings Christmas carols around the tree, everyone laughs around a huge table of food, and everything is red and green and lit-up and glorious. Let’s face it-this isn’t real. Everyone is unique and every family is different. When we expect too much, we miss out on little things that could be great experiences. It’s easier said than done (trust me, this is a hard one!), but it’s important to remember that it will pass and to make the most of the situation as it is, not what we expect/would want it to be.

 

Family is messy. The holidays can be stressful, to say the least. But YOU CAN DO IT! Take care of yourself first and foremost. You are important! You deserve a HAPPY HOLIDAY.

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Written by Danyelle. Project Coordinator

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Trainer & Coordinator: Danyelle Hooks

Trainer & Coordinator: Danyelle Hooks

Many of you know Danyelle from last year, but if you haven’t met her yet, here’s what you need to know:
Roles: administrate website and social media, coordinate and facilitate school workshops, plan EOY event, conduct Youth Mental Health First Aid trainings, develop and revise materials
logoExperience: worked with children and adolescents in inpatient behavioral health, lead HS community leadership group, engaged urban students and promoted success, co-chair DBSA Young Adult Council
Professional interests: community mental health (especially faith-based programs and in schools), mental health awareness, holistic wellness, anti-stigma *educate>>stop stigma*

 

Important Stuff
Why I’m here: lived-experience with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder; promote recovery & resiliency, *inspire others* #unashamed

Fun StuffAYNIL graphic
Likes: walruses, popcorn, ice cream, running, camping/hiking, water sports, cats, people-watching, star-gazing, sleeping, surprises, FOOD, the Beatles *all you need is LOVE*, Hello Kitty, JESUS #unashamed, Team RWB
Dislikes: tomatoes, dolphins, the ocean, things in between my toes, conflict, loud noises, crowds, data/numbers, cars, (surprisingly) technology
Life plan: get married, have kids, go back to school, become a counselor! :)

Random Facts
-I LOVE polka music.
-I’m afraid of heights, but I like to challenge that.
-My hair used to be neon pink.
-I’m getting *married* next year! <3
Bucket list: hike the Grand Canyon, climb Mt. Ranier, run the Yellowstone & Glacier Park half-marathons, learn Slovak

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My Story

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NEW TA: Jordan Corcoran!!!

NEW TA: Jordan Corcoran!!!

Jordan Corcoran went to Mercyhurst College. During her freshman year, she was diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder. After going through a very difficult struggle with coming to terms and learning to cope with these disorders, Jordan created an outlet where people can openly and candidly share their own challenges and personal struggles. She speaks publicly to college, high school and middle school students about her story, Listen, Lucy and the importance of acceptance– of others and of yourself. She is the author of Listen, Lucy Volume I and has been featured on Today.com as well as UpWorthy.com for her self love campaigns. Last year, she filmed The Acceptance Movement docu-series which features her speaking to 10 schools and organizations in the United States and revealing the powerful impact this organization can have on an individual. Her mission is simple- she wants to create a less judgmental, more accepting world.

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Jordan loves Beyonce, pizza, her husband, Reality TV and Doritos.

 

For more about Jordan and Listen, Lucy! check out the bio on her website!

 

 

PS: Jordan just published her second book to be released Nov. 8!!! We can’t wait!

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Minority Mental Health Month-Guest blog by TA Montaja Simmons

Minority Mental Health Month-Guest blog by TA Montaja Simmons

 

I do not know about you but I need a break!

Like a real break- specifically for my sanity and health and the reaffirming of my humanity,

Because clearly doing anything while Black is….

Well you get the point. If you don’t- Evelyn for the internets (@eveeeezy) explains it best.

Check out her “Call in Black” on YouTube:  https://youtu.be/cpVeUVcFMAU

Besides seeing people that look like you portrayed negatively in the media you also have to deal with your own personal woes….like mental health and wellness!

 

Society marginalizes people by gender, religion/faith, sexual orientation, intellectual status, class, disability and the biggest one of all RACE.

We forget that minorities deal with all of these “others” while being ‘othered.’

Unfortunately, just race alone can cause a whole host of worries.

I have a few things to keep in mind when living with mental illness while Black:

 

  • 1.) DO NOT BE SILENT

The more we talk about mental health, the more the stigma will dissolve. The more we talk about mental health in the minority community, the more real and human we become, dismantling barriers and stereotypes.  We don’t have to be “strong” all the time.

Mental health is not a race thing; however, minorities deal with mental health issues very differently. Trusting professionals and family plays a big part in feeling safe enough to get help without being label as crazy, weak or a criminal.

Silence is shame! Please continue to be an advocate!

 

2.) KNOW WHO TO TURN TO

Just like not being silent, we must also know where to go when we need help! We should have five people we can lean on in times of crisis. These are the makings a strong support system.

Do not wait until you are in a crisis to reach out to your support. As a minority, the world says you deserve what happens to you, be grateful you’re alive and pick yourself up by your bootstraps. It is crucial to have people in your corner reassuring your greatness and valuing your life.

 

3.) KEEP YOUR FAITH

This is very important for me, one because hope is the backbone of recovery. Even deeper for me is God. I am a believer in Christ.  In the Black community one my be ridiculed on both sides. Either you’re a fool to believe, or you don’t believe enough. Seeing a therapist, taking medicine if/when needed is not a sign of weakness or lack of faith. In fact, it is taking action- and faith without works is dead. Whatever you put your faith in continue to believe in it, because this is YOUR journey to recovery.

 

**Bonus tip**  DO NOT STAY PLUGGED INTO MEDIA OUTLETS FOR TO LONG!

Disconnect, decompress and treat yourself: mind, body and soul with care!

Please, please keep your wellness in mind.

Calling in mental health days are becoming a common practice in the work place.

Who knows maybe “Calling in Black” will follow.

 

Disclaimer: Black is what I identify as; this message is for all minorities! #minoritymentalhealthawarenessmonth

 

***Submission from Montaja Simmons***

 

(Stand Together staff disclaimer: This blog is the opinion of one of our staff members. Stand Together believes it is important to represent all individuals, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, etc. so that everyone has a voice. This is just one voice in our conversations around mental health. We hope to hear and share many others.)

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PTSD Awareness Day 2017

PTSD Awareness Day 2017

You may or may not know that today is PTSD Awareness Day. PTSD stands for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and occurs after an individual has seen or experienced a distressing event that involved the threat of injury or death, such as abuse, assault, war, or car accidents. An individual can also develop PTSD after extensive periods of verbal and mental/emotional abuse.

PTSD is real and serious. People aren’t just affected mentally. Extreme trauma can affect the way people physically and emotionally live as well.

Some people often associate PTSD with veterans (people that served in the military), but just like all mental health and substance use disorders, anyone can develop PTSD. It is estimated that one in thirteen people will develop PTSD at some point  in their lifetime. Here’s some of the important things to know:6.27.17 ptsd blog 4

-Creates feeling of intense fear, hopelessness, and terror
-Negative reactions to ‘triggers:’ things that remind people of the event
-Recurring dreams and ‘flashbacks’
-Affects relationships & every-day activities
-Results in avoidance of people/places/things associated with the event
-Sometimes block out event all together (ignoring/trying to forget)

Trauma is one of the hardest things to describe, much less respond and treat. A lot of individuals that have PTSD also turn to drugs and alcohol to self-medicate, making it even more complicated. The important thing to remember is to BE THERE. Encourage and support someone you know that has experienced something. It may be difficult to talk about and they may not want to share their experience, but let them know you’re always there to listen, hang out, or reach out to find help.

Here’s how one person described the experience of PTSD:

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Remember:

Educate yourself

You can’t help someone if you don’t know what it is they’re experiencing and where to get help. Learn about PTSD and educate others. Reach out to an adult you trust if you’re concerned about yourself or someone you know.

Fight the Stigma

Remind your loved ones it’s OK to not be okay. He/she is not alone and his/her struggles are valid. People can and do recover!

Be aware

Remember everyone is fighting their own battles. Remember, one in four people develop a mental illness in a given year. Mental illness is invisible; just because you don’t see it, doesn’t mean someone isn’t going through something.

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Recognition Event 2017

Recognition Event 2017

Words cannot express what an amazing experience we had on Wednesday, May 10 celebrating our Stand Together schools’ accomplishments this past year. Over 150 students and 100 supporters attended this years’ event at the Heinz History Center. All eight of our project completing schools were able to attend in some fashion and some even brought guests, give-a-ways, and goodies to share.

Arsenal giveaways WMHS giveaways

The chairs were full and the plaques were ready to be given out! After a brief introduction, the program began!

crowd plaques

Our featured speaker, Dese’Rae Stage, shared her moving recovery story and the students found hope and inspiration in her words. Many students could relate to her on a personal level and all the participants enjoyed viewing her work, Live Through This, and learning about other suicide survivors stories.

Dese speaks Dese and WMMS students

All of our schools did a fantastic job presenting their projects and demonstrating their mental health expertise and changes in school culture.

Here’s what each school came up with:

Propel: Braddock Hills High School’s projects were a HUGE hit. Their creativity and innovation always inspire other groups to take risks with their projects and think outside the box. This year, the students manufactured a ‘Thought Bubble’ that they used to invite their peers to stop stigma and increase social inclusion by sharing things that they struggled with, things that helped them cope with life’s stress, and things that inspired them. Students also created a life-size board game similar to Chutes & Ladders, in which participants scaled ladders when they supported a friend or talked about mental health, but moved down the slides when they used stigmatizing language or ignore’s signs/symptoms in a peer. The students wrapped-up their project with their annual Blackout Stigma day, in which students are allowed to dress-down in black clothes, participated in a moving wristband sharing activity, and took pictures at a photo-booth with an anti-stigma backdrop created by all the students at the school.

Propel gameboard Propel bubble

Propel was followed by Steel Valley Middle School. These students worked together with their HS counter-parts to unite their schools for a common-cause in their Breaking Barriers Dash. Students also facilitated a Glow-in-the-Dark dodgeball tournament for almost 200 students. Each team had to learn about, spread awareness, and represent their assigned mental health condition. The winners received gift cards. Students also conducted a Kindness Kafe at which they gave away free hot chocolate and ‘Breaking Down Barriers’ bracelets to discuss mental health and increase social inclusion. Students also had a #standtogether selfie station to remind their peers of the activities.

SVMS and MikkiSVMS presentation

Next, students in Arsenal Middle School shared their ‘Cool-Aid Stand’ project, explaining the importance of reaching out to their peers, meeting them where they are, and giving away something for free. As a Community School, Arsenal strives to involve parents and other community members as well. Check out their project!

Arsenal students     DSCN0475

Carlynton spoke of their ‘dirt’ and ‘sand’ bake sale in which they reminded peers that “Stigma is dirty!” and that they should “S(t)and Together.” The snacks had flags that discussed the myths and facts surrounding mental health conditions and sold out quickly! Carlynton is also going to be facilitating a 1:4 week soon.

Carlynton award Carlynton presentation

The Environmental Charter School returned to Stand Together after a one-year hiatus and it was great to see them engaging their peers again! ECS handed out hot chocolate and lemonade as well as wristbands to the students to educate them about mental health and substance use disorders. For every 3 green wristbands, there was 1 purple wristband that read “1 in 4 students have a mental illness” to visually represent the prevalence of behavioral health conditions. The students also had information readily available for students that wanted to learn more about common disorders or compare the myths and facts.

ECS table ECS award

Following ECS, West Mifflin MS shared their tier-3 projects, including a movie night featuring Inside Out and a Color Run, which was open for the whole community. Students also performed skits to talk about mental health and stigma before and during these events. One of the highlights of the day was the students interacting with guests, offering hugs-and giving them, along with passing out a pin with a motivational phrase written on it. There was definitely a lot of love going around the room!

WMMS group pic WMMS hug

Steel Valley HS capitalized on Valentine’s Day with their “Love is louder than any mental illness” campaign. Students decorated lockers with mental health facts and positive messages. They also held a door-decorating contest between homerooms that focused on educating each other about mental health disorders. The students largest event was a mental health fair. Students visited tables and activities set-up around the gym during their lunch periods to learn more about mental health conditions and stigma, participate in social inclusion activities, and de-stress through dancing, Twister, and coloring books. Steel Valley’s innovative theme made a huge impact in their school environment and many faculty members, as well.

SVHS table SVHS presentation

West Mifflin HS wrapped up the program describing their full year of events aimed at ending the stigma attached with mental health disorders. Early in the year, students held a balloon release for students to ‘let go’ of struggles and ‘soar;’ regardless of what was going on, students came together in a moving ceremony to ‘stand together’ in hope. Other projects included educating the preschool students, hosting a bake sale, holding a throwback dance, and presenting a school assembly. Another big event included their mental health fair. Much like SVHS, students learned about mental health, participated in social inclusion and coping skill activities, and played games that not only engaged students and rewarded them with prizes, but provided them with reminders of the things they learned that day. (Did you see some of the prizes above that they also handed out at the event?!)

WMHS award WMHS table

 

It was an absolutely fantastic event and everyone had a great time. Students and other attendees left inspired to address stigma in their schools and communities and continue in their plight to increase awareness, increase social inclusion, and encourage reaching out to an adult. Thank you all for everything you do for Stand Together! See you next year!

Student smiles

 

If you’re interested about learning more about Stand Together or bringing to to YOUR SCHOOL, please contact Danyelle Hooks at (412)350-3455 or danyelle.hooks@alleghenycounty.us.

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Valentine's Day: Let's Talk about Self-Love

Valentine's Day: Let's Talk about Self-Love

“Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence, and face your future without fear.” – Unknown

 


 

With all the hustle bustle of Valentine’s Day comes depressed feelings and anxiety for many. Too often, we define ourselves by who we are in a relationship with, who our friends are, the thoughts of ‘Keeping Up with the Jones’s,’ so-to-speak. And this ‘culture of perfectionism’ and social media?! It’s no wonder it’s hard to sort everything out. And there’s different kinds of love: romantic love, friendship…but there’s also another important kind: self-love.

It can be hard to talk about ourselves favorably. Sometimes we think about things we’ve done and feel guilt or shame, we judge ourselves harshly and it turns into feelings of failure and low self-worth. Sometimes it’s easier to hold hope for others instead-but it’s important to remember to take care of ourselves! Sometimes we’re our own worst enemy, with self-criticism and disapproval, but would you say those things to a friend? Of course not! Treat yourself the way you treat those you care about! And that starts with having self-compassion.

What is self-2-14-17 Self-love blog 1compassion? In the simplest terms, self-compassion means being kind to yourself, being gentle and supportive, and establishing a positive voice that can reason with you when you’re upset or having feelings of self-doubt. Kristin Neff, PhD, says we need to recognize the situation, resist negative thoughts, humanize yourself through empathic language, and commit to positive self-talk. You are not your experiences, your mental illness, or your past and there is no such thing as normal! Ese Moynihan-Ejaife, LMHC, reminds us that emotions are normal and important and although we don’t enjoy the ‘bad feelings’ as much as the pleasant ones, each emotion can provide a important lesson and challenges your preconceived notions about yourself in order to change you in a good way!

Self-compassion is hard! It’s definitely not easy, but it’s worth it. Self-criticism can lead to a weakened 2-14-17 Self-love blog 4immune system, relationship and motivation issues, and increased symptoms of depression. But self-kindess is an important skill for all of us to learn and use daily. Kim Fredrickson says: ‘It’s a process and it takes a while to learn, but it’s worth every effort. It changes you in a positive way and it lasts a lifetime.’

So how do you turn your inner critic into a compassionate friend and give yourself a break? Let’s start with some positive affirmations. Affirmations are statements of support and encouragement that can help get you through tough times and refocus your energy in a positive direction. Muhammad Ali said that ‘it’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.’ Everyone probably has a few phrases that mean a lot to them, but here’s some to get you started:

Just 2-14-17 Self-love blog 2keep swimming… (Finding Nemo)
-I am strong. I am worthy. I am loved. I am enough.
-Be brave. Stay strong.
You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. (Winnie the Pooh)
-I forgive myself and set myself free.
-What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
You are capable of amazing things.
-If you believe in yourself, anything is possible. (Miley Cyrus)
-Everything will be okay in the end. If it is not okay, it is not the end.
-Confidence comes from what I feel about myself. (Demi Lovato)
You are stronger than your circumstances.

Remember, self-love is not narcissistic or self-indulgent; it is an important component of mental health! Empower yourself: focus on building self-respect and allow yourself space to make mistakes, learn, and grow. You are you! It’s okay to not be okay! It’s okay to be whoever you are! You’re never alone!

Self-love is crucial because your external world will reflect how you feel about yourself. Self-love also gives you a safety net to take risks and go after your dreams, because you know that no matter what the outcome, you’ll be OK — your self-worth is not on the line.

In closing, LOVE YOURSELF!  Love doesn’t come once a year-it comes every day with how you treat yourself and how you share the joys of life with those important to you! Don’t give up!

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For more information, check out Kim Fredrickson’s book, Give Yourself a Break: Turning Your Inner Critic into a Compassionate Friend.

Information compiled from Self-Compassion: The Kindess Cure by Robin Flanigan in Esperanza magazine and The Little-Known Secret to Real Self-Love by Elyse Santilli for The Huffington Post. Image credits to the Sad Ghost Club, Danyelle Hooks, and Alexandra’s Sunset Photography.

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2016 Recap: A Year of Celebrities Speaking Out for Mental Illness

2016 Recap: A Year of Celebrities Speaking Out for Mental Illness
  • As 2016 comes to a close, many people start thinking about New Year’s resolutions, goals, dreams, aspirations, but it’s also good to think about the past, our experiences, lessons we’ve learned, and things we’ve accomplished. I recently came across an article that specifically addressed the rise of celebrities with mental illness speaking out in the media and sharing their experiences. This is HUGE! On our quest to combat stigma, celebrities bringing mental health into the mainstream is a great conversation starter and meaningful piece for others to share their stories and communicate their experiences with others. It’s great to hear celebrities and the media are using their influence to positively attack stigma.

 

Here are some of the celebrities that have opened up about mental illness this past year and what they had to say:

  • Kristen Bell, on feelings of depression: Its debilitation was all-consuming and it shut down my mental circuit board.
  • Selena Gomez, on her strugg12-30-16 post Kid Cudiles & recovery: I had everything and I was absolutely broken inside. And I kept it all together enough to where I would never let you down, but I kept it too much together, to where I let myself down…If you are broken, you don’t have to stay broken.
  • Kid Cudi, on his struggles & recovery: My anxiety and depression have ruled my life…[but] I deserve to have peace. I deserve to be happy and smiling.
  • Wentworth Miller, on resiliency: My endurance and my perseverance in the face of all kinds of demons. Some within. Some without. Like a dandelion up through the pavement, I persist.
  • Hayden Panettiere, on the significance of mental illness in her life: …impacted every aspect of my life…
  • Zayn Malik, on understanding mental illness: My anxiety is so upsetting and difficult to explain. It’s this thing that swells up and blocks out your rational thought process…It’s a constant battle within yourself.
  • Lady Gaga, on empathy: My own trauma in my life has helped me to understand the trauma of others.
  • Brandon Marshall, on standing together: How many others are out there suffering?…we have to galvanize this community.
  • Justin Vernon, on self-disclosure: I don’t like talking about it, but I feel it’s important to talk about it, so that other people who experience it don’t feel it’s just happening to them.12-30-16 post Demi Lovato
  • Demi Lovato, on continuity of care: It’s something you maintain to make sure that you want to live with mental illness. You have to take care of yourself.
  • Brandon Brooks, on anxiety: What I mean by anxiety condition [is] not nervousness or fear…I have an obsession.
  • Evan Rachel Wood, on stigma: For so long, I was ashamed. You’re dealing with the shame that the world has imposed upon you, and then on top of that, the shame of identifying that way…A good way to combat that and the stereotypes is to be vocal.
  • Cara Delevingne, on appearances: I realized how lucky and privileged I was, but all I wanted to do was die.
  • Prince Harry, on assumptions: A lot of people think if you’ve got a job, if you’ve got financial security, if you’ve got a family, you’ve got a house, all that sort of stuff-everyone seems to think that is all you need and you are absolutely fine to deal with stuff.
  • Rowan Blanchard, on mental illness as an opportunity: I learned this year that happiness and sadness are not mutually exclusive. They can exist within me at the same time in the same moment. While also becoming more forgiving of myself and my emotions, I became more forgiving of others.
  • 12-30-16 post Michael PhelpsMichael Phelps, on self-stigma: I went in with no self-confidence, no self-love. I think the biggest thing was, I thought of myself as just a swimmer, and nobody else…I was lost, pushing a lot [of] people out of my life-people that I wanted and needed in my life. I was running and escaping from whatever it was I was running from.
  • Jenifer Lewis, on getting help: I couldn’t ignore the fact that something was wrong anymore.
  • Adele, on experiencing mental illness: It can come in many different forms.
  • Jared Padalecki, on self-worth: I am enough. And you are enough…I know I can keep fighting and I know that I’m trying to love myself, but sometimes you feel like you’re not enough. So this message is helping me kind of understand that I am enough-just the way I was made.
  • Amanda Seyfried, on medication: What are you fighting against? Just the stigma of using a tool? A mental illness is a thing that people cast in a different category [from other illnesses], but I don’t think it is. It should be taken as seriously as anything else.
  • Catherine Zeta-Jones, on receiving a diagnosis: Finding out that it was called something was the best thing that ever happened to me! The fact that there was a name for my emotions and that a professional could talk me through my symptoms was very liberating.
  • Devon Murray, on speaking out: Open up, talk to people. If you suspect a friend or family member is suffering in silence [reach out] to them. Let them know you care.

 

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So as 2016 comes to a close, I’m grateful for the celebrities that have opened up about their experiences to begin to increase awareness and end stigma, but this is only the beginning. YOU can make a difference in your schools and communities, especially through the Stand Together initiative. As Gandhi said,

Be the change that you wish to see in the world. 12-30-16 post Gandhi

 

  • As Aaron Harvey describes our mission:
  • Many celebrities have helped bring the conversation around mental health into the main stream. But it’s on us to make the real change happen. While it’s amazing to have celebrities out there blazing trails and introducing a radical new transparency, the most important thing is that individual sufferers communicate with their everyday connections.

    If we really want to make an impact on stigma, it can’t just be a headline.

12-30-16 post Keep Calm

Special thanks to Robbie Couch who compiled these quotes into the article, 31 Celebrities who Smashed the Stigma Surrounding Mental Illness in 2016, on upworthy.com (12/20/2016).

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Get Your Sleep!: Facts & Tips

Get Your Sleep!: Facts & Tips

I recently participated in a webinar on Risk & Resiliency to Mood Disorders in Teens that focused on the importance of sleep and, coincidentally, My Fitness Pal also released an article on the effects of sleep deprivation. Adequate and quality sleep is important for every one at any age, but especially for adolescents. Sleep, however, is a bio-marker of good overall health. The brain plasticity and structural reorganizations (big words for ‘brain changes’) during the teenage years can explain the onset of mental illness in young adults, which can be further influenced by sleep deprivation. Okay, now that all of that confusing information is over, here’s what you need to know:

Facts
-Increased sleep debt (sleeping less than 8 hrs/night over an extended period of time) caused a ‘inadequate sleep epidemic’
70% teenag12-21-16 blog addition 2ers experience an insufficient amount of sleep on an average school night
-Poor sleep leads to poor school & work performance, substance use disorders, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and suicidal ideation
-Individuals with a greater stability of daily rhythms (aka regular sleep patterns) have lower self-reported stress
-The University of Chicago found that men who slept only 4 hours/night for 2 nights increased their caloric intake (appetite) by 24%
-The number of car accidents involving teens in the morning increases the earlier school starts in the morning
-According to the CDC, more than 1/3 of Americans aren’t regularly getting enough sleep
-Check out this infographic!

12-20-16 Sleep Blog-Deprivaton Infographic

As you can see, sleep deprivation is a HUGE problem for everyone, especially teenagers, whose biological clocks, hormones, and neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) are already all over the place! So what can YOU do to avoid this?

Tips
-Keep regular daily routines12-21-16 blog addition 3
-Decrease interpersonal problems aka drama, if possible
-Practice mindfulness (being in the moment)
-Consider exploring yoga, tai chi or other relaxation techniques
-Exercise regularly, even if it’s just a brisk walk
-Keep a regular sleep schedule and avoid variability (changes) and over-scheduling (being too busy)
-Limit caffeine intake and ‘screen time,’ especially at night
-Go outside! Your body needs sunlight to function well (yes, even in winter!)

Sleep is an important part of self-care and wellness. Get your sleep on!

(Special thank to Under Armour/My Fitness Pal and the International Bipolar Foundation for ideas and info!)

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