Posts Tagged SHE

NAI: First Year, Fantastic Plans

NAI: First Year, Fantastic Plans

The sun shined though the huge glass windows in the Lounge at North Allegheny Intermediate High School in early November, welcoming students to their first training workshop. It’s NAI’s first year in the program (jumping on the bandwagon from NASH’s participation last year) and as the Fall leaves swirled around, signifying the change of the seasons, the students were eager to start changing the culture around mental health in their school.

Students shared a lot of laughs and had a lot of fun while learning and growing together. Students learned about mental and substance use disorders, stigma, and how to help their peers. They also got to know each other in fun games, such as Common Ground, that encourage them to build relationships with each other. Our teams act as ‘micro-cosms’ to their schools and the connections they make during the trainings will overflow onto their classmates as well, promoting social inclusion (one of our goals). The group left the first day with the education and experience to come back the following week to start planning projects to end stigma in their school.

Students were eager to share their ideas with the team and ‘dive right in’ the second training workshop. Students thought it was very important for their peers to know that many people (1:4!) are living with mental and/or substance use disorders and that they are not alone in their struggles. Another important focus was to share resources and encourage students to reach out to an adult they trust when they’re worried about themselves or someone else (another one of our goals).

We stress that students are not counselors and that weight is not theirs to bear, but there are things they can do to support a friend or family member, summed up in the acronym S.H.E.: provide support, hope, and encouragement. Youth can also continue to include students in daily activities, encourage their peers in their treatment and coping skills, and just be there for them. We don’t have to ‘fix’ things others are struggling with and it can be scary to sit in the silence, but sometimes, all someone needs is someone to sit with them in their struggle to remind them that they are not alone and that you are there for them.

The NAI team plans to implement a food and candy stand, host a 1:4 photo booth, and create a video to connect students to resources and adults to get help. Their slogan, ‘Tigers Talk about It!’ reminds their peers that #itsokaytonotbeokay and that #itsokaytogethelp. They want to normalize conversations about mental health in their school and help others on their journeys by uniting the student body in solidarity to end stigma.

We can’t wait to see your projects in action, stop by for some sweet treats, and learn about the changes you’ve made in your school with your passion and projects. Keep up the great work!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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NASH:PAWS-itevely Promoting Mental Health

NASH:PAWS-itevely Promoting Mental Health

North Allegheny Senior High School began its second year in the program-and brought their Intermediate High School with them, too! We’re excited to expand our program in the NA school district and NASH has really taken Stand Together and ran with it. We look forward to another year with this group of youth! And it all starts with the training…

Many of the students in the team returned from last year and a handful of passionate new students came together in October to learn about mental and substance use disorders, the definition and examples of stigma, and how to help their peers. Students from various groups across the school spent two days getting to know each other and work together to plan projects to end the stigma associated with mental health and substance use disorders in their school.

Some activities got intense-it was a pretty competitive group!-but the students learned a lot and had lots of fun. The team had insightful responses to the role playing prompts in the What Would You Do? exercise and were eager to share what they learned with their peers. The group had learned so much and could share the ‘Big 5’ by heart:
1) You matter.
2) You’re not alone.
3) SHE (support, hope, encouragement aka How to Help)
4) 1:4 people have a behavioral health condition
5) WHAPP!: withdrawal, hopelessness, agitation, personality change, and poor self-care (the signs of a mental or substance use disorder)
By the end of the day, the group was really starting to come together and already had some great ideas for projects!

The group was overflowing with ideas for this year. It was incredibly difficult to pick only a few to focus on, but the students combined some ideas, elaborated on others, and were able to form concrete planning for three big projects, including peer education in PE classes *2 days!*, a ‘truth tree,’ and permanent mural. They also want to continue using visual media and videos to share the information with their peers; this year, they’re going to focus on what to do and how to help. By incorporating physical/social activities, informational presentations, and moving visuals, NASH hopes to continue their work to decrease stigma in their school.

Students finished up the day by sharing a behavior that they were personally going to start and/or stop doing to address stigma as a result of the education and experience they received during the Stand Together training. Team members shared commitments to care more about their own mental health, speak up when someone uses stigmatizing language, and let others know that they’re there for them when they’re struggling.

Thank you, NASH, for pledging to speak up and speak out against stigma, to not use stigmatizing language, to share information, resources, and experiences, and to provide support, hope, and encouragement to others. You’re changing your school, community, and the world! Keep up the good work!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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It’s Time to Recognize! ST Teams 2019

It’s Time to Recognize! ST Teams 2019

Every year this is always the most difficult blog to write because I don’t know where to begin to describe the talent and passion of the youth that I am so blessed to work with. I usually only try to speak for myself, but I can say with 100% certainty that Montaja, Mike, all our TAs, and I are so incredibly proud of each and every one of you. This week’s Recognition Event was an absolutely magical experience and if you missed it, we can’t wait to share it with you!

 

featureA little bit about Stand Together/this year: ST has been in schools for the past six years, expanding each year to reach more and more middle and high school youth through student-driven anti-stigma projects that are increasing education and awareness, promoting social inclusion, and encouraging help-seeking behaviors. This year, ST trained 18 schools, 16 of which completed projects, and 14 were able to participate in this year’s event. The Heinz History Center was packed with youth and adult advocates that are enthusiastic about ending the stigma associated with mental and substance use disorders. This was our biggest year yet, with around 300 in attendance!

 

Our schools designed and implemented so many uniqueOC table-r and innovative projects for their peers. The tried & true food and beverage stands are always a hit. Mental health fairs and presentations are making a come-back. Several schools decorated 1 in 4 stairs and their stairwells, while others created murals and plastered pledges on the walls. Some of our most creative projects for this year included Propel BHHS’s ‘Shine a Light on Mental Health’ paper lantern activity, WMHS’s ‘Toilet Talk’ booth, Shaler HS’s ‘Truth Tree,’ and SVMS’s ‘March Madness’ basketball tournament. Each year the students’ projects amaze us more and more, but the most important piece is the impact the students share about the changes that are taking place in their school culture. Take a look:

 

WMHS presenters

WMHS presenters

Student presenters shared that students are more comfortable talking about mental health and are more apt to reach out to ask questions and seek help. Students are using less stigmatizing language and aware and respectful of the invisible challenges they may be facing. The school culture is more accepting, encouraging, and supportive. Teachers and staff are forming relationships with students and challenging their own assumptions and stigmas. Lives are being changed daily thanks to the work of these students and advisors and we couldn’t be more proud.

 

Stigma is not gone, but little by little, our teams

N. Allegheny students at the photo booth

N. Allegheny students at the photo booth

are ‘chipping’ (cookie joke) away to break stigma and create better mental health environments in schools and even their communities. Events like these help the students see that they are part of something bigger than the projects in their individual schools-they can and are making a difference. As our keynote speaker remarked, ‘You may never know the ripple effects of your work,’ but we can already see the changes that are taking place-and we look forward to an even ‘brighter’ (lantern pun) future for mental and substance use disorders.

 

We can’t thank you enough for all the time, talent, and commitment you’ve contributed to this cause. We’re lucky enough to be able to lay the foundation-and then you run with your ideas and plans and turn this into something marvelous and meaningful. To our all teams, congratulations on another amazing year stopping stigma, one project at a time.

 

 

Special thanks to our school teams:

 

ST TY poster-r

 

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Propel BHHS: Stigma is Sour-Support is Sweet

Propel BHHS: Stigma is Sour-Support is Sweet

Stigma is Sour-Support is Sweet! This is the motto echoing in the halls of Propel Braddock Hills High School after their recent slushie event. Monday morning, Stand Together students hosted a snow cone stand for their peers in each lunch period. The group members ran different stations of the stand to guide their fellow classmates through the activity, educate them about mental health conditions, and reward them with a fun treat to ‘ice out stigma.’

 

 

20190325_113717The snow cone event was the first event of this year’s activity week. The group also used their video editing skills to piece together an educational video about the events to be advertised in each classroom. Another event, entitled ‘Shine a Light on Mental Illness, ‘ took place after the students viewed the clip in their ‘crews’ (like homeroom). Paper lanterns were given to each ‘crew’ as prompts to engage in conversations about mental illness. Teachers and students were asked to write statements and questions about mental health on the lanterns. Later in the year, these lanterns will be displayed in the school to illustrate the importance of inclusion, support, hope, and encouragement (S.H.E.).

 

The last event of the year is a visual representation of the 1 in 4 ratio of individuals that are affected by mental and/or substance use disorders in a given year. Students are encouraged to ‘X’ out stigma as they become aware of this ratio. Using their student body, 25% of the school will display an ‘X’ on their face. Those students who volunteer will be gifted a ‘Shine a Light on Mental Health’ t-shirt for participating.

 

 

Stand Together team members are working hard to create a safe and inclusive environment for individuals with-and without-mental and substance use disorders in their school. Remember, #itsokaytonotbeokay’ and #itsokaytoaskforhelp. Propel BHHS ST group has got what it takes to bring people together and to be a beacon of hope. Great job! Keep promoting mental health awareness!

 

Written by Montaja, trainer

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Avonworth Antelopes are Attacking Stigma-One Activity at a Time

Avonworth Antelopes are Attacking Stigma-One Activity at a Time

Avonworth Senior High School leaped into its first year with Stand Together with a lot of energy, fun ideas, and passionate youth. This year’s plans included two Food 4 Thought activities and a photo booth. The Stand Together team was really excited to share their knowledge with their school to stop stigma.

 

Screenshot_20190313-135256The group kicked off the year with classroom presentations to acclimate their peers to the Stand Together group and give them an idea of what will be going on this year. Around the same time, the students implemented their first give-away activity. Students selected a random slip of paper from a large bowl and they had to determine whether the statement was a fact or myth about mental and/or substance use disorders. The ST team hoped that they would be able to eliminate the stigma created by myths and replace them with facts. Afterwards, the students received a ‘Jolly Rancher’ candy and one to put in a jar. Once the jar was full after the activity, students were encouraged to guess the number of Jolly Ranchers in the jar to win the jar. That’s a lot of candy!

 

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The group also had a S.H.E. Cookies event. Students wereScreenshot_20190314-150744 incentivized to come up to the stand with a promise of free cookies, but first they had to talk about S.H.E. with the ST team members. It’s not only important to know how to recognize the signs/symptoms of a mental and/or substance use disorder, but also how to respond when someone you know is struggling. That’s where S.H.E. comes in: Support, Hope, and Encouragement. We’re not counselors or mental health professionals,Screenshot_20190314-150757 but we can be there for our friends and family and support them with a shoulder to cry on and a listening ear, hold hope for them when they struggle to do so themselves, and encourage them to get help from a trusted adult when it’s interfering with their daily life. S.H.E. doesn’t ‘sell sea shells by the sea shore;’ S.H.E. helps others when they’re struggling.

 

photo booth crop

 

The group’s final event, which I had the pleasure of attending,props crop was their photo booth. There were three green streamers for every purple streamer, signifying the 1 in 4 individuals that are affected by a mental and/or substance use disorder in a given year. Also on the background were thought bubbles with their social media info. Students could also choose from various props to have fun while learning about mental health and taking a photo to remember their experience. The photos will be printed out for the students to keep and another copy will also be used to create a collage to display in the school. Mara did a great job explaining the reason for the fun:

 

 

You had a great first year, ‘lopes, and we can’t wait for next year! Keep up the good work and see you in a couple weeks at the Recognition Event! (Shameless plug: for more information on the event, click here.

 

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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South Park: Holidays are for Mental Health Awareness

South Park: Holidays are for Mental Health Awareness

South Park High School used holidays to their advantage their first year in Stand Together, planning events around less busy times in their school that could better reach students with clear minds and change their hearts. This years’ events occured around the winter holiday season, Valentine’s Day, and St. Patrick’s Day. Last week, with some ‘luck of the Irish,’ the ST team raised awareness about mental and substance use disorders with their peers.

 

March sign

‘Lucky to Break Stigma’ flyers hung in the hall of the school to display information in classrooms and around the school to prepare their classmates for the event. With the help of teachers in the study halls, announcements were made to encourage students to head over to the table and ‘test their luck’ on the trivia questions. Decked out in green, Stand Together advocates hosted a food table during student study halls. Students felt ‘lucky’ when they tested their chance at answering trivia questions. For the correct answers, each winner got to pick-up a green cookie and some ST swag. Not only did students walk away with free treats, but also with a better knowledge about stigmatizing behavior and how to stop it. The swag helps, too, as a constant reminder to promote ST goals in their school (education/awareness, inclusion, reaching out for help).

 

ST students were excited to use St. Patrick’s day as aMarch table 2 theme for green treats and prizes, which helped to tie the color to mental health awareness (green). For an extra boost of positivity, a team member also created a daily message on their school app to push the messages of S.H.E. and it’s okay to not be okay.

 

The team also held a ‘silent bingo’ activity before the holidays to introduce students to mental and substance use disorders. In addition, they had a ‘Mental Health is a HOT topic’ hot chocolate stand for Valentine’s day. The group is excited to attend the Recognition Event and share their projects with the other teams. All of the students are ready to come back next year.

 

              silentbingo             hottopic

 

Check out this video of Keri-Anne sharing their projects:

 

 

Great job on your Food 4 Thought events and we’re excited to see what’s in store for next year!

 

Written by Montaja, trainer

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Shaler MS ‘Bands Together’ Against Stigma

Shaler MS ‘Bands Together’ Against Stigma

You know how much we like our puns! And we know that fun slogans get students interested and help them remember the activities our teams do. We love it when students come up with their own creative ways to increase the impact of their projects and Shaler Area Middle School was no different. The first project they implemented this year encouraged students to ‘band together’ against stigma, a fun play-on-words (‘Band Together’||Stand Together).

 

The Stand Together team set-up tables outside of the lunchroom, which was a great idea since every student had to walk past them to get into the cafeteria. In addition, students announced the event on the PA system to encourage students to visit the booths. At quiet times, students even recruited friends and other students from the lunch room to participate in the activities! The team was excited to involve their peers and provide education and awareness to stop stigma.

 

 

t2 redoOnce students reached the tables, they were greeted by Stand Together team members. The student then spun a wheel to determine which question about mental health and/or stigma they would answer to get a prize, in this case, either a green or red/blue wristband to symbolize the 1:4 youth that are affected by mental and/or substance use disorders in a given year. That’s a lot! Not only could students see the visual in the basket of bracelets, but they will be able to continue to see it as they walk through the school and see all the students wearing their bracelets. Students received a wristband whether or not they answered the question correctly. The point wasn’t necessarily to ‘test’ their knowledge, but to act as an opportunity to educate the students in a casual way.

 

After the students answered a question, they were encouragedDSCN1501 to sign the anti-stigma pledge. Cards with the pledge and Stand Together logo and graphics were given to the students to sign and date as an official commitment of their conscious efforts to decrease stigma. The students then plastered the walls with these pledges as a reminder to the entire student body of how they were going to ‘stand together’ to address stigma and change the culture of their school.

 

 

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DSCN1514There’s was plenty of handouts and information on hand and the students were willing and eager to answer any questions their schoolmates may have about the topic. I overheard some really great discussion and a lot of students were very invested in talking about mental health and stopping stigma-which is great, because that’s Stand Together is all about! Ms. Coleman, one of the advisors and a guidance counselor, even got a local policeman to participate in the discussion. He candidly shared how he deals with stigma every day on the force, especially towards individuals with mental and/or substance use disorders and how he attempts to combat this at any opportunity he gets. It’s such a wonderful thing to hear that this is happening in the community as well as the school environment. Change is a continual process and take a lot of time, energy, and people, but we can stop stigma, one person at a time.

 

Shaler MS also has a Snowflakes and Snickerdoodles Against Stigma activity and give-away planned as well as another cookie event to encourage their peers to ‘Take a Bite Out of Stigma.’ We’re impressed with the passion and creativity of these students in their first year and can’t wait to hear about their other projects at our Recognition Event in the Spring! (Innocent plug, if you’re interested in attending, mark your calendar for April 10 from 10-12:30 at the Heinz History Center!)

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Shaler MS ‘Bands Together’ Against Stigma

Shaler MS ‘Bands Together’ Against Stigma

Shaler Area Middle School is joining their high school counterparts in Stand Together this year to take action against stigma. Mr. Lisowski & Ms. Coleman’s crew was large and mighty and they came up with some incredibly creative projects for this year. Students are focusing on increasing education and awareness as well as social inclusion in fun activities for their peers during lunch.

 

 Stand Together workshops cram a lot of information into one day and sometimes it can be difficult to absorb it all, so we review several times throughout the day, as well as provide takeaways for the students. We also engage the students in meaningful activities that help them remember the concepts while having fun, too. For example, we have all the students stand up and the trainer counts off by four. The first three students can sit while the fourth remains standing. Once we have gone around the room, the students can visualize the ratio of students that have a mental or substance use disorder (1:4). Another activity, Ships & Sailors, is a game of elimination in which students must follow directions and form groups of a specific number in order to stay in the game. Afterwards, we discuss what it was like to be ‘eliminated,’ excluded, and ‘betrayed.’ This is what stigma feels like. To remember the five most common signs of mental and substance use disorders, we have the students repeat them back to each other and give each other a ‘high-five.’ (Did you know physical action helps your brain remember things?)

 

Another important piece of our trainings is learning how toIMG_20181206_091323 respond when you recognize those signs in someone you know. We emphasize that the students are not professionals, but there are still things they can do to help. That’s where the acronym S.H.E. comes in: support, hope, and encouragement. Students can be there for their friends that are struggling, hold hope for them when they cannot do so for themselves, and encourage them to talk to an adult/get professional treatment. We also realize that youth can identify concerns in family members as well. In the clip below, students review a scenario in which a student’s aunt is demonstrating signs of a mental illness. The students share how they would approach that individual, what they would say, and what they would do.

 

 

This year, the group has planned three unique projects to engage their peers. In January, students will ‘Band Together’ Against Stigma by answering questions about mental and substance use disorders and receiving a wristband to represent the 1:4 individuals that are affected by these conditions. Students are also using a winter theme (and cookies!) for students to share their personal experiences with mental and/or substance use disorders. Sharing our stories IMG_20181127_110112helps decrease stigma by promoting awareness and increasing social inclusion; students find that they are not alone in their struggles and they have more in common than what separates them. Lasly, the students are planning another cookie give-away to dispel the myths about these disorders and/or perform a socially inclusive act. This activity plays on the game, “Truth or Dare.” Students will have to decide whether a statement is a fact and/or do something to get to know someone new.

 

We’re excited to see these projects over the course of this year-and get some cookies while we’re at it! I have to say Snickerdoodles are a pretty underrated cookie, so I’m excited to see these treats teach and encourage other students to talk about mental and substance use disorders as they ‘Band Together’ against stigma.

 

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written by Danyelle, coordinator

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North Allegheny Tigers Talk Truth-Awareness & Inclusion

North Allegheny Tigers Talk Truth-Awareness & Inclusion

Another first year school, North Allegheny High School was incredibly impressive. Right off the bat, the students were already aware of many of the myths and were prepared to counter them with facts as early as the first activity. It was such a privilege working with such a passionate and aware group. Most of the team is also members of the school’s S.A.D.D. group. Even though they had some bonds and connections (and a decent knowledge of mental health), there were still plenty of new people to meet and new information to learn and share.

 

IMG_20181101_135505Although the students were very quiet at first, with some encouragement they quickly opened up. Everyone was willing and excited to participate in the trainings. One of our larger groups (30 members), it can be intimidating, especially for more reserved students. The most memorable moment for me was the discussion after Cross the Line. IMG_20181101_133950There were so many different perspectives and each student had a unique story to share. The group was vulnerable with each other and left the day feeling empowered to challenge others’ thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors to decrease stigma in their school.

 

IMG_20181113_102404The team couldn’t wait to start planning their projects. As a large school with many staircases, the students decided to use them to their advantage to kick-off the year by grabbing the students’ attention. Stand Together will be decorating each fourth step with green tape to provide a visual representation of the ratio of individuals that are affected by a mental and/or substance use disorder (1:4). The students plan to follow this activity with a video of both students and faculty sharing their own personal experiences with mental health, whether their own or someone they know. This will also serve as a transition to a form of Truth Booth the students will facilitate later in the year. The team also has a few other small activities throughout the year, so they’re definitely going to be busy!

 

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A special shout-out goes to Mr. Longo, one of their advisors. He spent almost a year trying to get Stand Together into N.A. and it’s definitely paid off. The group is great, the advisors are invested, and leadership is abound. We can’t wait to see their projects in action this Spring!

 

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Flashback Friday: Allderdice HS is BACK-with a Vengeance to FINISH THAT DRAGON!

Flashback Friday: Allderdice HS is BACK-with a Vengeance to FINISH THAT DRAGON!

Allderdice High School (PPS) has returned for their second year to Stand Together-and a devotion to finish one of their projects from last year, a dragon mural to ‘burn stigma.’ In addition, they’re hoping to do a couple other projects to reach their peers in a variety of ways.

 

IMG_20181015_110544The students at Allderdice tend to be one of our most diverse groups and it definitely brings a lot of different experiences to the table. There were also two teachers that teamed up with the group this year and are excited to join the group. They also had many returning members and they came back with the same passion and IMG_20181025_100207tenacity they finished the year with in 2018. Both the students and advisors were very moved by Cross the Line, breaking down the barriers and stereotypes they had for each other. Several students shared their own struggles with mental illness.

 

The best part of the day for me was when the students responded to the What Would You Do? scenarios. They had very thoughtful answers and had the skills to assess situations for WHAPP (withdrawal, hopelessness, agitation, poor self care, and personality change) and implement SHE (support, hope, encouragement) in their responses. Student relationships and the youth voice are crucial to the success of Stand Together and over the years, groups refine their skills to provide empathy, information, and resources to their peers.

 

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The group definitely bonded over the two days of training and are looking forward to finishing planning their projects and implementing them in the spring. Keep an eye out for that dragon!

 

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Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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