Posts Tagged sleep

A Happy, Healthy New Year: New Year, Better You

A Happy, Healthy New Year: New Year, Better You

The common phrase we hear around the New Year is: New Year, New Year. I want to tell you that you are already enough! But there’s always things we can work on to better ourselves and achieve our goals. We don’t want a ‘new you;’ our goal is to give you some tips and tricks to incorporate into 2018. No matter if you set resolutions or just see it as another day, it’s important to remember that the small things matter, you’re not alone, and we’re in this together.

The most important of them all:

 

You DESERVE to be HAPPY!!!

1.3.18 new year blog (1)Should I say it again? YOU! Yes, you! Many of us struggle with self-confidence, high standards/expectations, and so much pressure. Sometimes it’s hard to think that there’s more to life than the hustle and bustle of everyday or the chasing the ideas of perfection. You are unique. There is no one else exactly like you in the world. You are human and you deserve love and happiness. And that starts with you. You’ve got this!

You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.
– A. A. Milne

2. Treat yo-self!

I know we preach and preach about self-care, but is it so 1.3.18 new year blog (2)incredibly important. You can’t pour from an empty cup, so the saying goes. As members of Stand Together, we ask you to be there and practice SHE: support, hold hope, and encourage each other. You can’t do that if you’re not well. Eat a healthy diet, get enough sleep, exercise, and do things you enjoy. Be kind to yourself. Take care of your mind, body, and spirit (aka holistic wellness). Take care of yourself and you’ll be able to share yourself with others.

3. Surround yourself with positive people.

We all need SHE in our lives. Friends and close family members are some of the most important tools for resiliency (the ability to bounce back after difficult experiences). You’re never alone and we’re in this together. Don’t be afraid to share your joy, your fears, your struggles with someone else. We have more in common than we do different.

1.3.18 new year blog (5)4. Don’t sweat the small stuff-but the little things matter.

This comic is me to a ‘T.’ So often I focus on the few negative things than all the great things. It’s so hard to do! We have to rewire our brains to make this happen-but it’s well worth it. At the same time, we need to appreciate the little things in life: a text from a friend, a sunrise/sunset, (for me) a nice cup of tea…the list goes on. Gratitude helps us stay centered and have a more positive outlook. Have you given thanks today?

Last, but not least…
5. This is YOUR year.

You have the power to change things you do not like. You have the ability to set boundaries to protect your mental health. You have the chance to advocate for yourself and others. You can and will make a difference. We believe in you. Live in expectation; the best is yet to come. Happy, Healthy New Year!

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Written by Danyelle, Project Coordinator

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Holiday PSA: Stress, Self-Care, and Mental Health

Holiday PSA: Stress, Self-Care, and Mental Health
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Danyelle sharing a part of her recovery story at When the Holidays Hurt…

For most, the holidays are a time of great joy, excitement, and family fun, but for many of us, the holidays hurt. They’re hard. They’re not ‘pretty presents wrapped up in a bow’ or feel-good festivities, but sources of pain, struggle, and/or sadness. Memories of a lost loved one, negative feelings/experiences, and expectations can make it difficult to enjoy this time of the year. I shared my experiences last night at a Human Library presentation; we’re not alone in our struggle. Some of us, myself included, also experience Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), which means that when the sun is in low supply and it’s cold and dreary, our mental health takes a nose dive. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to consume us. Whether you have a mental health condition or not, there are things you can do to de-stress and engage in acts of self-care to promote positive mental health over this season.

1.  It’s OKAY to take a break from family, especially if they challenge your mental health. You can do this respectfully by setting boundaries and limits. It’s okay to politely excuse yourself for a few moments (or longer) to collect yourself, reconnect, and reboot.

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2. Back to Basics: self-care also includes eating healthy foods, exercising, and making sure you get enough sleep. Putting yourself first is not selfish; it’s necessary. It’s okay to indulge in some holiday treats-Hello! Christmas Cookies!-but we like to stick to an 80-20 rule (80% clean/healthy, 20% not so much).

REI-_OptOutside_Anthem_Film_153. Get Outside! Remember REI’s catch-phrase #optoutside? Even though sunshine is hard to come by this time of the year, getting some fresh air is good for the body, mind, and spirit. Be mindful of your surroundings: What do you smell? Hear? See? Feel? Embrace the now! Pet that dog (probably ask first). Catch a snowflake on your tongue. Take a good wiff of that bakery-it’s okay to stop in for a treat too :)

4. Do what YOU do! Make sure to engage in activities you enjoy. Read a book, watch a movie, knit, bake…whatever you like to do, make time for you! Little moments of stability can do wonders for your mood.

5. Be mindful. Savor the good times. Stay positive; surround yourself with positive people, if you can. Make time for those friends you haven’t seen in a while or spend some time with that favorite relative. Our perspective determines our reality; if we’re looking for good things, we’ll be able to find them. Practice gratitude and celebrate the small things. Imperfections are a part of the ride and they don’t define the event/who you are.

expecations6. Set realistic expectations. Society bombards us of the idea of this ‘perfect family holiday’ where everyone holds hands and sings Christmas carols around the tree, everyone laughs around a huge table of food, and everything is red and green and lit-up and glorious. Let’s face it-this isn’t real. Everyone is unique and every family is different. When we expect too much, we miss out on little things that could be great experiences. It’s easier said than done (trust me, this is a hard one!), but it’s important to remember that it will pass and to make the most of the situation as it is, not what we expect/would want it to be.

 

Family is messy. The holidays can be stressful, to say the least. But YOU CAN DO IT! Take care of yourself first and foremost. You are important! You deserve a HAPPY HOLIDAY.

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Written by Danyelle. Project Coordinator

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World Bipolar Day

World Bipolar Day

What do you really need to know about bipolar disorder? World Bipolar Day is observed annually on March 30 and reminds us that stigma is a reality for people with bipolar disorder; it hinders their ability to achieve wellness. We want to bring the world population information about bipolar disorders that will educate and improve sensitivity toward the mental health condition.

French researchers in 2012 reported that fewer than 70% of the general population could name specific characteristics of bipolar disorder and most identified the media as their main source of information (which is probably not a good thing). There are a lot of misconceptions about what it means to have bipolar disorder. Even though symptoms c3-30-17 wbd blog 3an vary from person to person, there are certain characteristic behaviors and expressions that mark this condition.

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by opposite states: mania and depression. Mania is a period of time when an individual experiences increased energy, motivation, and social activity; decreased attention span; indecisiveness; insomnia; and (sometimes) engagement in risky behavior. Depression, on the other hand, is a period of time when an individual experiences decreased energy and motivation; feelings of sadness, emptiness, and worthlessness; social isolation; significant weight loss/gain, and insomnia. Having this disorder can consist of experiencing one episode at a time or a mixed state of both. Some individuals affected by bipolar disorder may transition rapidly from one to the other and some have longer periods of time between episodes. For some, the states may be incredibly extreme, for others, generally mild. Bipolar disorder is a complicated condition!

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Bipolar disorder affects approximately 27 millions people worldwide. Celebrities that have self-disclosed having this mental health condition include: Demi Lovato (singer), Russell Brand (comedian), Carrie Fisher (actress, Star Wars), Amy Winehouse (singer), Vincent Van Gogh (painter), and Winston Churchill (British Prime Minister). Personally, I am also affected by this disorder and share my recovery story during the Stand Together trainings.

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There are a few myths we want to point out, too:
Bipolar moods aren’t equally split.
-Treatments take time to work and usually include a combination of medication and therapy, not just one or the other.
Not everyone with bipolar disorder is the same.
-How individuals affected by bipolar disorder react and respond to situations varies greatly.

Bipolar disorder is not 3-30-17 wbd blog 4something to be taken lightly; it’s not something to joke about and minimize by using it inappropriately (ie slang: She’s so bipolar!, etc.). It is a serious mental health condition with sometimes severe disruptions in daily function and can include suicidal ideations and behaviors.  If you or someone you know is displaying signs of this condition, be sure to talk to an adult you trust or reach out to a mental health professional.

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(Special thanks to Gabe Howard’s article, “What I Wish the World Knew about Bipolar [Disorder]” (BP Hope, Spring 2016). Reference the DSM-IV for symptoms and further description. Also, check out www.facebook.com/worldbipolarday for more info.)

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Get Your Sleep!: Facts & Tips

Get Your Sleep!: Facts & Tips

I recently participated in a webinar on Risk & Resiliency to Mood Disorders in Teens that focused on the importance of sleep and, coincidentally, My Fitness Pal also released an article on the effects of sleep deprivation. Adequate and quality sleep is important for every one at any age, but especially for adolescents. Sleep, however, is a bio-marker of good overall health. The brain plasticity and structural reorganizations (big words for ‘brain changes’) during the teenage years can explain the onset of mental illness in young adults, which can be further influenced by sleep deprivation. Okay, now that all of that confusing information is over, here’s what you need to know:

Facts
-Increased sleep debt (sleeping less than 8 hrs/night over an extended period of time) caused a ‘inadequate sleep epidemic’
70% teenag12-21-16 blog addition 2ers experience an insufficient amount of sleep on an average school night
-Poor sleep leads to poor school & work performance, substance use disorders, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and suicidal ideation
-Individuals with a greater stability of daily rhythms (aka regular sleep patterns) have lower self-reported stress
-The University of Chicago found that men who slept only 4 hours/night for 2 nights increased their caloric intake (appetite) by 24%
-The number of car accidents involving teens in the morning increases the earlier school starts in the morning
-According to the CDC, more than 1/3 of Americans aren’t regularly getting enough sleep
-Check out this infographic!

12-20-16 Sleep Blog-Deprivaton Infographic

As you can see, sleep deprivation is a HUGE problem for everyone, especially teenagers, whose biological clocks, hormones, and neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) are already all over the place! So what can YOU do to avoid this?

Tips
-Keep regular daily routines12-21-16 blog addition 3
-Decrease interpersonal problems aka drama, if possible
-Practice mindfulness (being in the moment)
-Consider exploring yoga, tai chi or other relaxation techniques
-Exercise regularly, even if it’s just a brisk walk
-Keep a regular sleep schedule and avoid variability (changes) and over-scheduling (being too busy)
-Limit caffeine intake and ‘screen time,’ especially at night
-Go outside! Your body needs sunlight to function well (yes, even in winter!)

Sleep is an important part of self-care and wellness. Get your sleep on!

(Special thank to Under Armour/My Fitness Pal and the International Bipolar Foundation for ideas and info!)

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