Posts Tagged Words Matter!

World Mental Health Day 2019

World Mental Health Day 2019

Each year on October 10, advocates around the world promote recovery and wellness through education and awareness. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the suggestion of the World Health Organization (WHO) and has expanded to over 150 countries to bring attention to mental illness and its major effects on peoples’ lives. This day also provides an opportunity for organizations to talk about their work and what more needs to be done to make mental health care a reality for people worldwide.

Talking about mental health is especially important for youth and young adults. One in four people experience a mental health or substance use condition in a given year and most disorders emerge in adolescence. In addition, suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-29 year olds. The number of middle and high schoolers with anxiety and depression has steadily increased and social media has made it difficult to escape the constant pressures of life. Anyone can develop a mental health condition, regardless of age, race, sex, gender orientation, ethnicity, or financial status.

There are so many ways to get involved, whether you have conversations about mental health, support your friends and family, or re-direct inappropriate language (i.e. ‘crazy,’ ‘psycho,’ etc.). Check out our list for How to Be Helpful to Peers and don’t forget to sign our pledge to end stigma.

We can make mental health stigma a problem of the past as we Stand Together. Be the change!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

Posted in:

Leave a Comment (0) →

World Mental Health Day 2018

World Mental Health Day 2018

October 10th was World Mental Health Day. In solidarity, people all over social media posted about their mental health experiences, spreading awareness, and working towards stopping stigma. But how do you help a person who is experiencing a mental illness? That’s where recovery comes into play.

 

WMHD blog 3More commonly than you would think, the definition of recovery is misconstrued. People think that recovery is a one-time event but really, recovery doesn’t have an end. Rather, recovery is the continuous process of improving one’s health. The goal is to live a healthier and more fulfilling life. The recovery journey is unique to each person. People will have achievements and setbacks in their recovery, but it’s all part of the process. That’s why it’s important to celebrate the progress that people make in their recovery.

 

It’s also very important to spread awareness and educate everyone about the process of recovery. That’s why we talk about recovery for not one, but two months:

 

The month of September focuses on substance use while October focuses more on mental health. Both substance use and mental health recovery maintain that recovery is an ongoing process, however substance use recovery emphasizes harm reduction and decreasing or eliminating substance use while mental health recovery aims to reduce or eliminate symptoms. This can be best achieved through a combination of medication, therapy, and rehabilitation. Just like any other illness, mental and substance use disorders can be reoccurring. That’s why it’s important to know that recovery is ongoing. Recovery is all about making connections, having hope, establishing a strong sense of self, finding meaning or purpose in what you’re doing, and being empowered. These tenants of recovery serve as a foundation for living a higher quality and healthier life.

 

WMHD blog 5

The fact that September and October are so focused on recovery gives us the opportunity to start discussions about mental health and substance use. It’s a reminder that these topics need to be talked about. Staying silent doesn’t help; stigma hurts everyone. There’s so much stigma surrounding substance use and mental health. People think that people who are experiencing substance use disorders and mental illness choose to live this way. They take the person out of the equation and use stigmatizing language like “crazy” and “junkie”, not acknowledging that whatever place these people may be in their recovery journey, they are still people-first. If we can all just make one change in our lives, how about using more thoughtful language? Take stigmatizing language out of your vocabulary and instead say “person experiencing bipolar disorder” or “person experiencing a substance use disorder.”

 

WMHD blog 4            Another important way we can help others in their recovery journey is by reaching out. If you see someone who seems socially disconnected, ask him/her how he/she is doing. These simple words can have a major impact. Isolation makes people more stressed, serving to further negatively impact people’s health. By connecting with others, we can instead help them build resiliency, the ability to cope with and adapt to challenges and change. Resilient people have a good skillset to help them deal with stress and have the motivation to begin or continue the process of recovery. Because of this, building resiliency can be the turning point in someone’s recovery.

 

Helping other people recover is what spreading awareness is all about. Whether someone is experiencing substance use disorder, mental illness, or a combination of the two, talking about not just the illness but about recovery can make a significant difference. So, reach out to someone you know and start a conversation about recovery today.

 

WMHD blog 2

 

Written by Leah, intern

Posted in:

Leave a Comment (0) →

West Allegheny: ASSEMBLE! Stop Stigma!

West Allegheny: ASSEMBLE! Stop Stigma!

West Allegheny HS Stand Together students have been hard at work, creating and facilitating an amazing assembly for their classmates and various stigma awareness projects the last few weeks. They’ve clearly become ‘super heroes’ in the mental health revolution! Check out these amazing activities!

On February 13, the Stand Together students held an assembly at their school to kick-off this year’s projects. The students shared facts about mental illness, emphasized that Words Matter!, and talked about the impact stigma has on individuals struggling with their mental health. One phenomenal student, Jake, talked about his depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The students also marked every fourth chair with a green paper and had these students stand up, representing the ratio that 1 in 4 youth are affected by a mental health condition in a given year. The students did an absolutely amazing job right out of the gate this year!DSCN1101

The students also held their first of three educational give-away stands to talk to their peers about mental health in a casual, fun way. In the first event, the Stand Together team manned tables and walked around the lunch periods talking about how peers could support, hold hope, and encourage (SHE) each other when they are struggling with a behavioral health concern. Students were asked if they could share what the three letters meant in order to receive a HerSHEy kiss to ‘kiss stigma goodbye.’ Students were also asked how they would use SHE to reach out to a friend. After participating, students could also receive a bonus Lifesaver mint after signing the pledge to end stigma, since they could be a ‘lifesaver’ to someone they know. There was plenty of candy, the Stand Together students were excited to talk to their peers, and everyone learned a lot-and had a great time.

Even though this is their first year in the program, West Allegheny Stand Together students are making waves at their school and are fighting against stigma, one ‘kiss’ at a time.

STAND TOGETHER…ASSEMBLE! On three…1, 2, 3…

Written by Danyelle, Project Coordinator

Posted in:

Leave a Comment (0) →