Posts Tagged solidarity


Deprecated: image_resize is deprecated since version 3.5.0! Use wp_get_image_editor() instead. in D:\Websites\standtogether.againststigma.org\test\wordpress\wp-includes\functions.php on line 4775

Guest Blog: Finding Humanity Amidst the Chaos (Julius Boatwright)

Guest Blog: Finding Humanity Amidst the Chaos (Julius Boatwright)

We are honored that Mr. Boatwright has agreed to compose a special blog about community written specifically for Men’s Mental Health Month 2020. (More about Julius can be found after the blog.)

While we’re living in the midst of a public health pandemic and seeing some of the most wretched police brutality happen, it can be difficult for us to honor the humanity in other people. Every time we scroll through social media, we don’t have to look far to find someone making a divisive comment that alienates a group of people who are already marginalized. When we’re bombarded with these messages, it can be challenging for us to see the good in people as human beings.

As most of us know, George Floyd was murdered by a police officer on film. It’s important because the way he died was different than how other Black people have while in police custody. Watching an officer apply the weight of his body on George’s neck until he became lifeless was a shock to our souls. This was long, drawn-out, and heart-breaking. There are hundreds of folks who have been murdered during routine interactions with law enforcement. As a society, we’ve become desensitized to seeing someone murdered on video by officers. With George Floyd though, that desensitization was reset.

Then, something different began to happen across the globe. On social media, we started to see people from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds coming together to impact change. At protests, white bodies placed themselves on the front lines to protect Black people. Companies began to donate millions of dollars to Black-led organizations doing work at the grassroots level. Politicians began to stand in solidarity with Black activists fighting against police brutality.

What happened to George Floyd, coupled with the world’s heightened emotions due to COVID-19, put people in a place where they finally said, enough is enough.

Does this mean that racism is over, police brutality will stop, and humanity is saved? We have a long way to go before we reach that point.


I believe that every day, people are beginning to see that Black people deserve to be loved, valued, and appreciated like everyone else in the world.

After losing my best friend from college to suicide years ago, I knew that honoring people’s humanity was part of my greater purpose. We have feelings and emotions. We go through trials and tribulations. We experience joys and successes. All of these things are part of being a human.

I hope that we continue to honor this sentiment when no one’s watching and the cameras stop flashing. I envision a future in which we don’t have to advocate for people to believe in humanity. I believe that as humans, there’s goodness in all of us.

I believe we have the power to stand up to racism and bigotry together for the betterment of our society. The younger generation is rising to the occasion and driving this movement in a sustainable, transformative direction. We should all be excited about how systems and archaic policies are being challenged right before our eyes. The revolution is happening today and it’s a beautiful experience to witness.

In solidarity,
Julius

About the writer: Julius Boatwright is a licensed social worker and Founder/CEO of Steel Smiling, a local organization that bridges the gap between Black community members and mental health support through education, advocacy, and awareness. Mr. Boatwright’s work engages Black communities in the Pittsburgh area and throughout the country to create connections and address the specific challenges they face. His personal experiences, education/background, and passion for addressing trauma and mental health have overflowed into a range of services to help Black children, youth, and families learn about mental health, share stories about their experiences, and strive to collectively heal.

Special thanks to Julius for sharing a part of himself and his wisdom in this meaningful blog. You can learn more about Steel Smiling at their website and on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Posted in:

Leave a Comment (0) →

Deprecated: image_resize is deprecated since version 3.5.0! Use wp_get_image_editor() instead. in D:\Websites\standtogether.againststigma.org\test\wordpress\wp-includes\functions.php on line 4775

North Hills Stand(s) Together: #onetribe

North Hills Stand(s) Together: #onetribe

When we presented Stand Together a year ago (can you believe it?!) at North Hills HS, the answer was a quick and resounding YES! The SAP team leaped at the opportunity to better the mental health environment of their school and provide the youth with a positive means of talking about mental health. In addition, we had a lot of support from the administration; the school’s principal was previously at one of our other ST schools! We knew it was going to be a great year from the start.

Even before the ST team met to complete their training, they had already completed an activity. At the first home football game of the season, mental health facts were shared on the sound system before the game and the student section had an impactful visual: a banner with various stigmatizing words was ripped to signify the end of stigma at their school with the start of the Stand Together program. Students also held up a Stand Together banner to symbolize their school’s solidarity. (#onetribe) What a great way to kick off the year! (pun intended)

After the activity at the game, the students continued their momentum by preparing for their first project: peer-to-peer presentations to be facilitated the week after the training! Students introduced themselves and the Stand Together program and had created a PowerPoint slideshow with information and a Kahoot! game. Their peers learned the definitions of mental illness and stigma and factual information to counter some of the myths associated with mental and substance use disorders. The group wanted their peers to know that they’re not alone and it’s okay to get help.

Individuals can’t choose to have a mental and/or substance use disorder, but WE can choose to help. STAND UP, don’t stand by!

The group continued the year by sponsoring a ‘trunk’ at their community ‘Trick’or’Trunk’ halloween event to become visible to and support their community. They also hosted a Star Wars themed mindfulness event during their school’s wellness week. After focusing on self-care, the team engaged their peers in an interactive event for both students and faculty. Students wanted their peers to be aware of the prevalence of mental and substance use disorders in youth by creating paper chains that were displayed around the school. Three chain links were white for everyone one red link to help students visualize the 1:4 ratio of those affected by these disorders. (Red and white are the school’s colors.) On each link, students were encourage to anonymously share how mental and substance health disorders have affected their lives. The chain also represented how the school was ‘Stand-ing Together,’ no matter their experiences or differences (#onetribe). A great number of students participated in this activity and the chains were on display for everyone to see for several weeks.

Unfortunately, North Hills didn’t get to finish all the projects they wanted to get to this year because of Covid-19 – but that didn’t stop them from pressing forward and continuing their efforts to end stigma! The students and advisors created a moving video of themselves sharing support and mental help tips for this challenging time. They wanted to remind their peers and others that they are not alone, remind them of Stand Together’s mission, and encourage their peers to take care of themselves in various ways, including pet therapy, time outside, motivation, and how to ‘stand together,’ even ‘while standing apart.’ Students were reminded to ‘stay home, but ‘stand together,’ One of my favorite parts was at the end when advisor Ms. Wrabley held up a poster with the following tips, forming the acronym SPEAK UP!:
-Start with family
-Phone a friend
-E-mail your counselor
-Ask for help
-Keep trying
-Use resources
-Phone #1-888-You-Can (Resolve Crisis Line)

North Hills High School had an AMAZING first year and we can’t wait to see what they come up with next year. This will be difficult to top, but we know they’re up for the challenge! We certainly are #NHproud! See you in the fall!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

Posted in:

Leave a Comment (0) →

Deprecated: image_resize is deprecated since version 3.5.0! Use wp_get_image_editor() instead. in D:\Websites\standtogether.againststigma.org\test\wordpress\wp-includes\functions.php on line 4775

NAI: First Year, Fantastic Plans

NAI: First Year, Fantastic Plans

The sun shined though the huge glass windows in the Lounge at North Allegheny Intermediate High School in early November, welcoming students to their first training workshop. It’s NAI’s first year in the program (jumping on the bandwagon from NASH’s participation last year) and as the Fall leaves swirled around, signifying the change of the seasons, the students were eager to start changing the culture around mental health in their school.

Students shared a lot of laughs and had a lot of fun while learning and growing together. Students learned about mental and substance use disorders, stigma, and how to help their peers. They also got to know each other in fun games, such as Common Ground, that encourage them to build relationships with each other. Our teams act as ‘micro-cosms’ to their schools and the connections they make during the trainings will overflow onto their classmates as well, promoting social inclusion (one of our goals). The group left the first day with the education and experience to come back the following week to start planning projects to end stigma in their school.

Students were eager to share their ideas with the team and ‘dive right in’ the second training workshop. Students thought it was very important for their peers to know that many people (1:4!) are living with mental and/or substance use disorders and that they are not alone in their struggles. Another important focus was to share resources and encourage students to reach out to an adult they trust when they’re worried about themselves or someone else (another one of our goals).

We stress that students are not counselors and that weight is not theirs to bear, but there are things they can do to support a friend or family member, summed up in the acronym S.H.E.: provide support, hope, and encouragement. Youth can also continue to include students in daily activities, encourage their peers in their treatment and coping skills, and just be there for them. We don’t have to ‘fix’ things others are struggling with and it can be scary to sit in the silence, but sometimes, all someone needs is someone to sit with them in their struggle to remind them that they are not alone and that you are there for them.

The NAI team plans to implement a food and candy stand, host a 1:4 photo booth, and create a video to connect students to resources and adults to get help. Their slogan, ‘Tigers Talk about It!’ reminds their peers that #itsokaytonotbeokay and that #itsokaytogethelp. They want to normalize conversations about mental health in their school and help others on their journeys by uniting the student body in solidarity to end stigma.

We can’t wait to see your projects in action, stop by for some sweet treats, and learn about the changes you’ve made in your school with your passion and projects. Keep up the great work!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

Posted in:

Leave a Comment (0) →

Deprecated: image_resize is deprecated since version 3.5.0! Use wp_get_image_editor() instead. in D:\Websites\standtogether.againststigma.org\test\wordpress\wp-includes\functions.php on line 4775

OCHS: Celebrities, Cookies, & Scrunchies…Oh My!

OCHS: Celebrities, Cookies, & Scrunchies…Oh My!

Lions and tigers and bears…Oh my! (Wizard of Oz) Celebrities, cookies and scrunchies…Oh my! (Oakland Catholic) Those animals are definitely something to be afraid of, but the students at Oakland Catholic High School weren’t afraid to tackle stigma in their school. Although this was their first year, the team created some great projects that will be remembered fondly for years to come.

light up sign

IMG_3134The team kicked off the year with visual representations to spread awareness. Team members decorated the staircases of their two building with different colored tape to represent the one in four youth that are affected by a mental and/or substance use disorders in a given year. Posters of prominent celebrities with these conditions were on the walls of the stairwells to spread awareness about the prevalence of these disorders and how they can affect anyone.DSCN1663-r Since it was their first year and first project, many of their peers were curious about the decorations and approached ST members to discuss the visuals. Many of the adults also commented that they did not know that these people lived with these disorders. This started the conversations that would be had over the course of the school year.

 

Students continued their discussion on the topic by using an activity to Crumble Away Stigma. Student participants spun a carnival wheel to select a questions about a mental health or substance use disorder. Students got to spin the wheel until they answered a question correctly. Some DSCN1688-rstudents had to get some help, but that just emphasises how much we need each other and that we’re not alone in our struggles. Participants were awarded with an infamous Ms. Judy cookie. Folks, these are homemade by one of the cafeteria workers and I can tell you from first-hand experience that they are amazing. No wonder this project was such a hit! Students were also encouraged to sign the Stop the Stigma pledge by means of a card on the cookie bag. The team continued promoting the 1:4 ratio with the cookies themselves: for every three Sprinkle with Kindness sugar cookies, there was a chocolate Chip Away Stigma cookie. Students were more than happy to participate with such a tasty treat at stake! Many of the school’s faculty and staff, including their priest and assistant principal joined in on the fun. I was so glad I could be there for this event!

 

The group’s last activity for the year combined a video presentation with an incentive give-away. 90s trends are making a comeback and scrunchies are a BIG deal at OC. In the video, students explained the idea behind the scrunchies, but, more importantly, the clip featured students and staff sharing their experiences with mental health and the ST program. ST students and members of the student body shared how the projects have affected them. One brave teacher shared that his own sister died by suicide. This video also gave students a lot of hope and helped others realize that they are not alone in their struggles. Then, students were encouraged to reach out to a ST member and discuss something they learned from the video to receive a scrunchie. As they said, ‘Together, we can scrunch away stigma.’ Students were proud to don their scrunchies as a symbol of solidarity against stigma.

 

 

OC is well on their way to ending stigma at their school. One student remarked,

Some of my friends deal with mental health issues and they were more open to talk about it at school because of the projects that the club put together.

We love hearing about the impact our students teams are making in their schools. When we  Stand Together to ‘crumble’ and ‘scrunch’ away stigma, more youth can get the help they need without fear of STIGMA (stereotypes, teasing, inappropriate language, ignorance, myths, and negative attitudes) and discrimination. Outstand job, Oakland Catholic! We can’t wait to see what you come up with next year!

 

group scrunchie throw

 

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

Posted in:

Leave a Comment (0) →