Posts Tagged speak up


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North Hills Stand(s) Together: #onetribe

North Hills Stand(s) Together: #onetribe

When we presented Stand Together a year ago (can you believe it?!) at North Hills HS, the answer was a quick and resounding YES! The SAP team leaped at the opportunity to better the mental health environment of their school and provide the youth with a positive means of talking about mental health. In addition, we had a lot of support from the administration; the school’s principal was previously at one of our other ST schools! We knew it was going to be a great year from the start.

Even before the ST team met to complete their training, they had already completed an activity. At the first home football game of the season, mental health facts were shared on the sound system before the game and the student section had an impactful visual: a banner with various stigmatizing words was ripped to signify the end of stigma at their school with the start of the Stand Together program. Students also held up a Stand Together banner to symbolize their school’s solidarity. (#onetribe) What a great way to kick off the year! (pun intended)

After the activity at the game, the students continued their momentum by preparing for their first project: peer-to-peer presentations to be facilitated the week after the training! Students introduced themselves and the Stand Together program and had created a PowerPoint slideshow with information and a Kahoot! game. Their peers learned the definitions of mental illness and stigma and factual information to counter some of the myths associated with mental and substance use disorders. The group wanted their peers to know that they’re not alone and it’s okay to get help.

Individuals can’t choose to have a mental and/or substance use disorder, but WE can choose to help. STAND UP, don’t stand by!

The group continued the year by sponsoring a ‘trunk’ at their community ‘Trick’or’Trunk’ halloween event to become visible to and support their community. They also hosted a Star Wars themed mindfulness event during their school’s wellness week. After focusing on self-care, the team engaged their peers in an interactive event for both students and faculty. Students wanted their peers to be aware of the prevalence of mental and substance use disorders in youth by creating paper chains that were displayed around the school. Three chain links were white for everyone one red link to help students visualize the 1:4 ratio of those affected by these disorders. (Red and white are the school’s colors.) On each link, students were encourage to anonymously share how mental and substance health disorders have affected their lives. The chain also represented how the school was ‘Stand-ing Together,’ no matter their experiences or differences (#onetribe). A great number of students participated in this activity and the chains were on display for everyone to see for several weeks.

Unfortunately, North Hills didn’t get to finish all the projects they wanted to get to this year because of Covid-19 – but that didn’t stop them from pressing forward and continuing their efforts to end stigma! The students and advisors created a moving video of themselves sharing support and mental help tips for this challenging time. They wanted to remind their peers and others that they are not alone, remind them of Stand Together’s mission, and encourage their peers to take care of themselves in various ways, including pet therapy, time outside, motivation, and how to ‘stand together,’ even ‘while standing apart.’ Students were reminded to ‘stay home, but ‘stand together,’ One of my favorite parts was at the end when advisor Ms. Wrabley held up a poster with the following tips, forming the acronym SPEAK UP!:
-Start with family
-Phone a friend
-E-mail your counselor
-Ask for help
-Keep trying
-Use resources
-Phone #1-888-You-Can (Resolve Crisis Line)

North Hills High School had an AMAZING first year and we can’t wait to see what they come up with next year. This will be difficult to top, but we know they’re up for the challenge! We certainly are #NHproud! See you in the fall!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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West A: Education & Engagement

West A: Education & Engagement

West Allegheny High School is no stranger to Stand Together. This is their third year in the program and each year it gets better and better. Although some of the students may change, their passion for ending stigma and focus on education and engagement shine beyond their years.

One of West Allegheny’s priorities has always been education. Whether it’s in discussions with staff/faculty during professional development sessions or during peer-to-peer sessions, the team uses contact in small groups to connect with their audience and educate them in a way that is not only fun and engaging, but also incredibly valuable.

Common Ground

Since one of the team’s advisors is the physical education and health teacher, she was more than happy to share time with her classes to discuss mental health, after all: mental health is just as important as physical health! Students learned not only about the Stand Together program and the West A projects, but also about mental health diagnoses and each other. Members started by engaging their peers in Common Ground, an activity where students learn more about each other by moving seats when different statements apply to them. This helps break-the-ice and get people moving and talking.

The rest of the time was spent sharing information and engaging in a diagnosis/definition match game and Kahoot! This medium has been a favorite for many of our schools as it uses technology and competition to keep the students engaged while learning the information. Students also shared some resources and how individuals could get help if they were worried about themselves or someone else. They covered all three goals in this project: increase education and awareness, promote social inclusion, and encourage reaching out to a trusted adult! Woah!

West A’s squad also had a W.H.A.P.P. day for the students in their school. The team painted their faces with a hand-print to signify the ratio of 1:4 individuals that are affected by a mental health and/or substance use disorder. Painted in green (mental health) and purple (substance use) awareness colors, their peers could visualize the number of youth experiencing these conditions and were also reminded of the W.H.A.P.P. acronym-signs they could see that someone was struggling and needed emotional support.

During this activity, students learned what stigmatizing language is, how to recognize it, and positive words to replace it with instead of the negative connotations associated with mental and substance use disorders. Students wanted their peers to know that a person is just that-a person-first and that a behavioral health condition doesn’t define who someone is; that disorder is only part of who they are. Although it may affect that individual in many ways, people with mental and substance use disorders recover and have successful, meaningful lives.

Students demonstrated this by removing a red post-it note with stigmatizing language on it with a green note with a personal characteristic or appropriate word/phrase. Youth that engaged in the activity also received a ticket to win a gift card as a token of the team’s appreciation. By the end of the day, all of the red had been replaced with green in the shape of a green ribbon for mental health awareness! What a meaningful visual and physical activity for students to participate in!

Students also signed the anti-stigma pledge, agreeing to:
-speak up and speak out against stigma associated with mental and substance use disorders in their school and community
-not use stigmatizing language, like ‘psycho,’ ‘crazy,’ or ‘mental,’ to refer to anyone, whether that person has a mental illness or not
-share information, resources, and experiences to spread awareness and acceptance
-provide support and hope and encourage others to seek help when they’re struggling (S.H.E.)

The team also had plans for a mural that is still in the works. This whole quarantine thing has really dampened a lot of our teams’ plans, but West A continues to work virtually to educate their peers and provide resources. They have recently started an online campaign to provide their peers with tools to help them deal with anxiety and engage in self-care, become aware of the signs, and learn when and-more importantly-how to get help. This virtual project continues to keep the team’s momentum, even if they can’t hold events in person! How awesome is that?!

Thank you, West A, for another great year! We can’t wait to see the finished mural and follow your virtual project for tips. You’re changing the world-one student and staff member at a time!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Woody High Rise Up-Again!

Woody High Rise Up-Again!

Back at it again for the second time, Woodland Hills High School’s Stand Together team returns to shift the culture in their school when it comes to speaking up and out about mental health.

Woody High students came together on two days in January and both new-comers and returning students were ready to really make an impact in their school with the Stand Together message. This year, the group started meeting long before the training workshops took place to get a jump-start on the year. What dedication!

The first day of training re-introduced the students to the important signs and symptoms of mental and substances use disorders and refreshed their memories on what factors cause these emotional struggles. The Stand Together workshops strengthened the already strong bond this group had created during the pre-training meetings. Friendly competition arose when reviewing the information during trivia games and a unity formed while sharing their own experiences during and after Cross the Line.

The second workshop was more hands-on: project planning. Returning members shared feedback with their peers from last year’s activities. They had even handed out pencils with a survey link before the workshops to get more feedback from the larger student body. Team members shared what they want their peers and staff to know when it comes to reaching out for help and even just talking about the struggles they may be dealing with. They want their teachers to know the right information and resources to provide effective support when students come to them. They also want their peers to know that mental and substance use disorders are more common than we think and that it’s okay to get treatment. These students see the need and want to shift the culture and dismantle stigma.

The group brain-stormed elaborate new ideas and revisited ideas from last year with a twist. They really want to focus on providing clear information in a fun and engaging way. The group plans to hold a school assembly and mental health Kahoot! game tournament, as well as a possible ice cream social.

Staying true to Stand Together’s mission and goals, Woodland Hills is ready to rise up to the challenge again. We have no doubt that they will surprise us with their anti-stigma events this year. We can’t wait to see all your hard work in action!

Written by Montaja, trainer

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Dorseyville MS: ‘What does the fox say?’ STOP STIGMA!

Dorseyville MS: ‘What does the fox say?’ STOP STIGMA!

Am I the only one that remembers that bizarre song? But I’m so excited to welcome Dorseyville (Fox Chapel) Middle School to the Stand Together program this year. This roaring group of almost 30 ‘foxes’ (their mascot) are ready to talk about mental and substance use disorders and ‘bark away’ stigma. (Yes, more fox puns…I couldn’t resist! – Don’t worry; they won’t be using this ridiculous phrase in their projects.)

The Dorseyville school and advisors were on-board from the very beginning. At our first meeting, there was a resounding Yes! to start a Stand Together chapter in the 2019-2020 school year. With administration, all the counselors, and a teacher advisor on-board, they were ready to jump in and hit the ground running! They easily hand-picked a large group of students to participate in the training. I was impressed with the balance of genders and variety of students they chose, including a handful of students that were not afraid to self-disclose their own experiences with mental illness.

This group was passionate from the get-go! Although it was a large group, students weren’t afraid to speak up and be heard among their peers, especially when it came to busting some of the myths and sparking conversations about examples of stigma and its negative effects on themselves and those around them. Some of the students were slow to warm-up, but eventually became comfortable with sharing in the group and were just as invested as their teammates. They learned so much so quickly-review was a blast! They really *sparkled!* (One of our review games is called Sparkle.)

The second workshop was where the students really *shined!* (see what I did there?) The students were so excited to share their ideas that I could barely get through the process discussion and examples! There were so many things that wanted their peers to know and so many ways they wanted to do so. By the end of the day, we settled on three projects with a spare if they have time at the end of the year. Lots of hands make the work light and lots of brains make the ideas flow freely!

This year, the team plans on hosting a snack stand, video/assembly, and 1:4 sticky note project. They started off thinking about doing donuts, but with 1000# students in their school, that could get pretty expensive! So they settled on brownie and lemon bites, which is a more manageable and fun alternative. Even though they’re a younger group (both in age and experience), they’re not shy about standing up in front of their peers and sharing their stories. They are also lucky enough to have a ‘Maker Space’ in their school and hope to design a fun take-away for the assembly. And, of course, the group is getting shirts to they can represent their team as they boldly stand-up to stigma by educating their peers, increasing awareness of mental and substance use disorders and stigma, and challenging myths and misconceptions that perpetuate stigma.

Welcome to the club, Dorseyville! We’re already impressed with your wealth of knowledge, wit, and willingness to share what you’ve learned and experienced with your peers. We can’t wait to see your projects in action and see the changes you make in your school and communities!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Hillel & Yeshiva Boys-Slogans for Days

Hillel & Yeshiva Boys-Slogans for Days

Stand Together trained it first ever all-boys schools this past December. This group may of been a little rowdy and a little wild, but they were a whole lot of fun and were clearly passionate about talking about mental health and ending stigma in their schools and communities.

Although the schools’ boys separated themselves at first, both by school and grade, and were quite quiet, they quickly broke down barriers and had a lot to say! That’s a good thing-we want our students to feel comfortable ‘speaking up and speaking out’ about mental and substance use disorders to increase awareness and decrease stigma. This group was ready and willing to share their own personal experiences, ask questions, and really dig into the topics at hand.

The activities were a wild ride! As boys tend to be-each activity became a competition, which made the day quite interesting, but exciting. The youth really enjoyed anytime there was a buzzer or ball, were pretty excited about the ‘bonus prizes,’ and were not only intense, but intimate with each other as well. As Rabbi Hoen explained to the youth, there is a passage in their scriptures about how it’s not healthy to keep in struggles and it’s important to seek the counsel of others. This directly parallels what we’re doing in Stand Together: encouraging youth to #talkaboutit (their struggles) and reach out to an adult they trust when they are worried about themselves or someone else. Rabbi Hoen’s statement really resonated with the students and motivated them even further in their work.

Armed with knowledge and quick wit, the students were ready to start project planning at their second workshop. The students broke into 4 groups: 2 for each school and 2 for each grade-level (MS/HS). The boys had so many ideas, it was hard to whittle it down to just a few projects, but they left the second day with concrete plans:
Hillel Boys MS‘s 1:4 Color War with trivia, competition, and prizes
Hillel Boys HS‘s: F-WHAPP Fanny Exchange Program (fanny packs-just you wait!) and Tea with Teachers
Yeshiva Boys MS/HS: This school did something different. Although each grade-level group came up with a project, both groups will do the same projects in their respective schools. They planned to hold a Do-nut Stigmatize stand and a What’s WHAPP? video. Afterwards, the students will test their peers’ knowledge by asking them myths/facts to win a prize.
These students really came up with some amazing ideas and even more creative slogans to go with them! They’re sure to entice their peers to participate and start talking about mental health and stigma!

I was sad to leave the group after the training, but I knew I was leaving them in good hands and with solid plans moving forward. This group is committed to leaving their schools and communities better than they found them and working together to reduce stigma so that more people can get the help that they need. We can’t wait to see these projects in action! See you soon!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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Hillel & Yeshiva Tag Team Against Stigma

Hillel & Yeshiva Tag Team Against Stigma

Stand Together is excited to welcome two more new schools this year. From Pittsburgh’s very own Jewish Community in Squirrel Hill: Hillel Academy and Yeshiva girls’ schools! Due to a generous grant from the Jewish Healthcare Foundation and other supporters, we were able to expand to all five (!) schools in this community.

Both schools trained together at Hillel this past November, right before the holiday. Students filed into the training space quiet and curious, but that didn’t last very long! The students got warmed-up to the topics discussed and enjoyed competing in the trivia games that aided in review. It was a busy two days! Laughter, team-building, and deep discussion happened with ease. These young ladies ranged in age and grade levels from 7th through 12th grades. As each training day went on, they discovered fascinating things they had in common with one another, much deeper than their obvious connection with culture and religion.

Although the community is very tight knit, the students still had to get to know each other better as they attend different schools. The teams learned more about themselves, the Stand Together program, and their trainer, Montaja. As each topic of the day was discussed, students started to speak more openly about their personal thoughts about the stigma surrounding mental and substance use disorders. These young ladies weren’t afraid to ‘Speak up!’ and ‘Speak out!’ about how challenging it is to reach out for help even with adults they trust around them. Without hesitation, the students created a long list of things that they’d like their peers and staff to know about mental health and stigma. Some of the things they mentioned included:
-Mental illness is invisible.
-Having a mental and/or substance use disorder is not ‘wrong.’
-Therapy is okay for anyone and everyone.

By the second training workshop, both schools were ready to plan and design their projects. After viewing other schools’ ideas and discussing some challenges they may have to work around due to the size and culture of their school, both groups put together solid ideas to carry out their project and the Stand Together mission.

Hillel Academy girls’ team are working on a year-long theme that will ‘bar the stigma.’ They’re going to kick-off the year with a hot drink bar to ‘scorch the stigma…not your tongue!’ This clever project will host a table decorated with myths, facts, and other information to start the conversation about mental and substance use disorders and stigma. To incentive their peers and staff to enjoy a cozy cup of tea or cocoa during the cold winter months and start talking about mental health.

Yeshiva girls are planning on using the Stand Together acronyms as a way to start the conversation:
-W.H.A.P.P. (signs & symptoms: withdrawal, hopelessness, agitation, personality change, and poor self-care)
-S.T.I.G.M.A. (examples of stigma: stereotyping, teasing, inappropriate language, myths, and attitude)
-S.H.E. (how to help: support, hope, encourage)
Their event includes a drink stand to further educate their peers and staff, focusing on how mental and substance use disorders are invisible and effect everyone.

It’s clear to see both schools are off to a great start. They are more than excited to get the facts out to their student body. What a way to start your first year! Welcome to the club-we can’t wait to see your projects roll out!

Written by Montaja, trainer

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NASH:PAWS-itevely Promoting Mental Health

NASH:PAWS-itevely Promoting Mental Health

North Allegheny Senior High School began its second year in the program-and brought their Intermediate High School with them, too! We’re excited to expand our program in the NA school district and NASH has really taken Stand Together and ran with it. We look forward to another year with this group of youth! And it all starts with the training…

Many of the students in the team returned from last year and a handful of passionate new students came together in October to learn about mental and substance use disorders, the definition and examples of stigma, and how to help their peers. Students from various groups across the school spent two days getting to know each other and work together to plan projects to end the stigma associated with mental health and substance use disorders in their school.

Some activities got intense-it was a pretty competitive group!-but the students learned a lot and had lots of fun. The team had insightful responses to the role playing prompts in the What Would You Do? exercise and were eager to share what they learned with their peers. The group had learned so much and could share the ‘Big 5’ by heart:
1) You matter.
2) You’re not alone.
3) SHE (support, hope, encouragement aka How to Help)
4) 1:4 people have a behavioral health condition
5) WHAPP!: withdrawal, hopelessness, agitation, personality change, and poor self-care (the signs of a mental or substance use disorder)
By the end of the day, the group was really starting to come together and already had some great ideas for projects!

The group was overflowing with ideas for this year. It was incredibly difficult to pick only a few to focus on, but the students combined some ideas, elaborated on others, and were able to form concrete planning for three big projects, including peer education in PE classes *2 days!*, a ‘truth tree,’ and permanent mural. They also want to continue using visual media and videos to share the information with their peers; this year, they’re going to focus on what to do and how to help. By incorporating physical/social activities, informational presentations, and moving visuals, NASH hopes to continue their work to decrease stigma in their school.

Students finished up the day by sharing a behavior that they were personally going to start and/or stop doing to address stigma as a result of the education and experience they received during the Stand Together training. Team members shared commitments to care more about their own mental health, speak up when someone uses stigmatizing language, and let others know that they’re there for them when they’re struggling.

Thank you, NASH, for pledging to speak up and speak out against stigma, to not use stigmatizing language, to share information, resources, and experiences, and to provide support, hope, and encouragement to others. You’re changing your school, community, and the world! Keep up the good work!

Written by Danyelle, coordinator

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World Mental Health Day 2019

World Mental Health Day 2019

Each year on October 10, advocates around the world promote recovery and wellness through education and awareness. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the suggestion of the World Health Organization (WHO) and has expanded to over 150 countries to bring attention to mental illness and its major effects on peoples’ lives. This day also provides an opportunity for organizations to talk about their work and what more needs to be done to make mental health care a reality for people worldwide.

Talking about mental health is especially important for youth and young adults. One in four people experience a mental health or substance use condition in a given year and most disorders emerge in adolescence. In addition, suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-29 year olds. The number of middle and high schoolers with anxiety and depression has steadily increased and social media has made it difficult to escape the constant pressures of life. Anyone can develop a mental health condition, regardless of age, race, sex, gender orientation, ethnicity, or financial status.

There are so many ways to get involved, whether you have conversations about mental health, support your friends and family, or re-direct inappropriate language (i.e. ‘crazy,’ ‘psycho,’ etc.). Check out our list for How to Be Helpful to Peers and don’t forget to sign our pledge to end stigma.

We can make mental health stigma a problem of the past as we Stand Together. Be the change!

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SAHS Tackles Stigma, One Leaf at a Time

SAHS Tackles Stigma, One Leaf at a Time

Shaler Area High School definitely took it up a notch this year with meaningful, intimate activities that promoted awareness, social inclusion, and help-seeking behaviors. Students advertised and shared information with colorful posters, enticed individuals to participate with visuals and treats, and helped students understand and make connections to experiences of mental health conditions and stigma.

 

In the fall, the team kicked-off the year with a 1:4 visual that not only represented the ratio of individuals affected by mental and/or substance use disorders, but also promoted social inclusion by presenting awareness of others’ struggles and insecurities. Students were given a slip of paper and instructed to write down an insecurity they experience. One in four¬†slips were green to create a visual of the statistic. After the activity, the slips were connected to form paper chains to signify that we are all connected despite our differences and many of us are struggling with the same insecurities. The chain was displayed on the school balcony for everyone to see.

 

SAHS blog-MH fairThe next event lured students into the library to participate in several activities that allowed students to experience what it may feel like to be an individual experiencing a mental health condition. At one station, students were given stacks of books to represent the stressors in one’s life and how that when they add up, they eventually become too much to bear. They also symbolized the ‘heaviness’ of each tasks that ‘weights down’ a person’s day. In another area, students were given headphones that played a wave of self-destructive thoughts while they were asked to engage with one of the team members. It was difficult for the students to hold a conversation when distracted by the voices, especially when they were very critical and antagonizing. The last station was a replication of an activity we do during the workshops in which students are asked to hold their breath until they no longer can stand it (safely). Students are reminded that the feelings of panic (rapid heart beat, fear, light-headedness, etc.) were examples of how someone might feel when experiencing a panic attack and how difficult it would be if you were having those sensations while at school or with friends. Students that participated were rewarded with candy and entered into a raffle to win one of six gift cards. This was a very impactful activity that allowed students to ‘walk in the shoes’ of someone that may be struggling with something that they don’t even know.

 

 

The team’s last activity in March was a twist on the truth booth:SAHS blog-tree.3 The Truth Tree. As the title of this blog suggests, the students were attacking stigma with leaves that participating students wrote down how stigma and mental and/or substance use disorders have affected their lives. On the front of the ‘booth’ was the elaborate tree frame with a back to display the trees and form the activity area in the back. Students were summoned to the privacy of the activity area to write down their experience (anonymously) and then stuck the leaf on the front of the backdrop for other students to view. The staff and students that participated were very open and honest and there were a lot of moving and difficult items shared on the leaves. Students revealed their personal struggles, concerns, and experiences in a safe way and the result was a feeling of support, a sense of togetherness, and a realization that we are all affected by stigma, no matter who we are. Students were given a ticket to get a brownie to thank them for their willingness to engage in a very revealing, personal activity. Students also shared information about the Student Assistance Program (SAP), mental and substance use disorder myths/facts, and Resolve Crisis cards for students to take with them in case they would ever need them for themselves or someone they knew. The school social worker was also on-hand to encourage relationships between adults and students, especially those providing mental health services at school.

 

 

We were so impressed with the creativity, vulnerability, and passion of this year’s team at SAHS. Their innovative projects and inclusive activities are sure to be creating a more safe, welcoming atmosphere for students regardless of whether or not they have mental and/or substance use challenges. Thanks, again, Shaler. You’re showing us that youth aren’t afraid to speak up and speak out about stigma and share their stories to encourage others. Kudos.

 

SAHS blog-tree.4

 

 

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