Posts Tagged suicide prevention


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Mental Health Advocacy & Me-ST Youth take on Legislation

Mental Health Advocacy & Me-ST Youth take on Legislation

We often hear: ‘Youth are our future.’ As cliche as it sounds, it’s 100% true. Change starts with you and YOUth across Allegheny County are paving the way for mental health education, resources, and parity by meeting with local legislators to discuss the future of mental health in our area.

Stand Together staff had the pleasure of assisting the Jewish Healthcare Foundation and PA Youth Advocacy Network in planning and implementing the Youth Mental Health Advocacy Workshop on Tuesday, March 3 during the Dan Miller Disability Awareness Summit-but the students did all the work. Members of Stand Together teams from CAPA, Montour, West Allegheny, and West Mifflin high schools joined students from other schools to gather their perspectives on teen mental health and work together to identify issues, formulate questions, and propose suggestions to advocate for mental health. Afterwards, the students had the opportunity to discuss their findings with members of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and Senate.

Team leads walked their groups through concerns and opportunities, current and proposed policies/bills, and the importance of youth voice in government. These weren’t easy issues either! Students discussed:
-Addressing disparities in mental health;
-Creating safe, inclusive school communities;
-Educating teachers and students on mental health;
-Equality in support for mental and physical health; and
-Promoting suicide prevention and awareness.
Stand Together’s goals address many of these areas: increase education and awareness, promote social inclusion, and reach out to an adult (which requires adequate training for staff and faculty). Because of this, Stand Together team members brought a wealth of knowledge and expertise to the tables that day!

Our students made some really introspective and keen observations and remarks:
-‘It’s important to talk about mental health just as much as physical health in school…it needs to be stressed and ‘normalized.’ – Emma Dischner (HB 1696: Mental Health Parity)
-‘The media needs to stop making suicide look like a way out.’ – Angela Brown, West A (SB 199: Suicide Prevention & Awareness)
-‘Females tend to get more mental health attention in schools. Talking about mental health is a ‘choice,’ but because of the culture of toxic masculinity, it’s also not a choice. ‘Treatment’ is for the behaviors, not the cause (mental health)…A big part of it is changing the cultre surrounding mental health and making small changes.’ – Aiden Magley, CAPA (Federal: HRes480: Disparities in Mental Health)
-‘It should be a conversation between youth and staff what Act 71 (suicide prevention education) looks like in schools. – Emma Dischner (HB 590: Ed. for Teachers & Students in MH)
-A student from Montour agreed: ‘Teachers are afraid to reach out to students because they don’t know how to or are afraid to.’

The legislators were invested and had much to add:
-‘You can’t reach your potential unless this issue of mental health is addressed.’ – Sen. Pam Iovino
-‘What’s more important as a parent? That my son has a cavity or a mental health issue?…I think it (mental health) should be prioritized…We’re bringing students together, but we’re not talking about it enough and this can cause social isolation. We need to teach all health in fullness and connect people together.’ – Rep. Dan Miller
-‘We need more human-centered policies that have real-world application (about the people, not the numbers). Engagement of students and citizens is so important.’ – Rep. Sara Innamorato

Students and legislators discussed a lot of key issues, but this is just the start. We need to keep talking about mental health in our schools and communities and advocate in government for policy reform and support. We will continue to support our students as they speak up and speak out against stigma and build a youth mental health advocacy movement that will change our county for years to come.

‘Keep it going…you are just as much our constituents as your parents are. Keep using your voice.’

-State Senator Lindsey Williams

Written by Danyelle, ST Coordinator & JHF planning team member

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Suicide Prevention Week-What you need to know…

Suicide Prevention Week-What you need to know…

Suicide affects all of us. 1 in 5 teens seriously consider suicide each year. It tears a hole in our lives and communities that we can’t easily repair. That’s why preventing suicide from occurring is so important. This is especially true given that mental health is a major contributing factor in suicides.

 

suicide week blog 1

 

Way too often, communities keep quiet about mental health issues. There’s a stigma about openly discussing mental health and suicide. This very stigma can discourage a community or individual from implementing suicide prevention programming or seeking help. Rather than preventing suicide from happening in the first place, communities oftentimes take action after the tragedy has already occurred. However, the best place to start is before a suicide occurs. That’s where organizations like the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the Yellow Ribbon Suicide Prevention Program come into play.

 

suicide week blog 3The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention runs programs designed to prevent suicide. These include K-12 educator trainings on detecting mental health changes in their students, presenting lectures about suicide and suicide prevention, providing mental health first aid trainings, and community-based walks that raise funds to further promote suicide prevention.

 

Similarly, the Yellow Ribbon Suicide Prevention Program offers youth and teen trainings, community yellow ribbon logomember trainings, trainings for educators, and suicide prevention cards that encourage youth to seek help from community members when they are experiencing thoughts of suicide.

 

Both organizations aim to prevent suicide. This single goal is so important that it has an entire month (September) dedicated to recognizing the prevalence, need for resources, and opportunities to intervene before an event occurs. If that doesn’t speak to the importance of suicide prevention, then what does?

 

suicide week blog 2

 

Each and every one of us is responsible for creating an environment where suicide is not seen as a viable option. It’s important to speak up about suicide. Stifling the conversation only serves to make suicide seem like something it’s not. Suicide is not an escape from the awful parts of life or a way to win. Suicide is a loss of what could have been and an end to what was. There is no coming back. And that’s why we place so much emphasis on prevention rather than intervention. We can’t stop what has happened, but we sure can stop it from happening in the future. So this September, talk about suicide and prevention because as long as the conversation continues, change will happen.

 

suicide week blog 5If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, reach out to the Suicide Prevention Lifeline. There are trained professionals that want to talk to you. Even when you think no one is there, there is hope. You’re not alone. We’re here for you.

 

Written by Leah, intern

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